Working for Good, Clean, Fair Food for All - Slow Food Urban San Diego Convivium of Slow Food International


Roosevelt Middle School Garden Volunteers Build Big!

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Lots of volunteers at RMS. Photo credit: Kathryn Rogers

From constructing raised beds for planting sweet potatoes to weeding garden boxes in preparation for the summer harvest, it was a productive day in the garden for the more than 50 volunteers who joined Slow Food Urban San Diego at Roosevelt Middle School on April 18.  Volunteers, including children, families, community leaders and a team from Navy Logistics, came together to help prepare the community and school gardens for planting.

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Happy RMS volunteers! Photo credit: Kathryn Rogers

The Roosevelt school gardens are home to educational classes and community activities that allow students and local residents to development a deeper sense of self, their relationship with nature, our community, and our world.

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RMS Volunteers working hard. Photo credit: Kathryn Rogers

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Roosevelt Middle School Volunteers. Photo credit: Kathryn Rogers

After a fun day in the sun (sunscreen provided!), volunteers shared stories and relaxed while munching on burritos donated by Chipotle and snacks provided by Specialty Produce.
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Volunteers relaxing. Photo credit: Kathryn Rogers

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Photo credit: Kathryn Rogers

-contributed by Kathryn Rogers

Edible San Diego for Kids Issue #3

Slow Food Urban San Diego is excited to announce the arrival of the Spring 2015 issue of Edible San Diego for Kids. This issue is all about seafood. It features articles written by San Diego kids and a delicious seafood recipe that kids can help make at home. There’s also a gardening activity (hint: what squiggly crawlers help soil to stay healthy?). This issue is a bit more advanced that our first two, so we recommend it for 4th through 6th grade students.

Edible San Diego for Kids is produced by Slow Food Urban San Diego’s Education Committee in collaboration with Edible San Diego. If you are interested in having copies delivered to your school, please email christina@slowfoodurbansandiego.org by April 20th.

You can see the issue online here.

This issue was made possible by the generosity of Chipotle!

Support Fishermen’s Markets in San Diego and California – Support the Pacific-to-Plate Bill

Friendly neighborhood fishermen

Slow Food Urban San Diego is excited about the new proposed legislation that will help California fishers get their products to Californians. State Assembly Speaker Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego) has introduced legislation, “Pacific to Plate,” to clarify and streamline state laws to make it easier for San Diego’s Tuna Harbor Dockside Market, and other fishermen’s markets like it, to grow and thrive. See how you can support California’s fishermen’s markets and the Pacific-to-Plate bill below.

Slow Food Urban San Diego and Slow Food California Support this legislation. 

Three barriers in the current California laws and regulations affect fishermen’s markets in California:

  1. Current laws and regulations in California do not define fishermen’s markets so prevent them from easily obtaining permits to operation. 
  2. Current laws and regulations do not allow fishermen to clean fish for direct sale to consumers.
  3. Current laws allows direct fresh-caught fish sales to occur only from permanent, temporary, or mobile food facilities where permits are required for each participating fisherman or aquaculturist.

The proposed legislation:

  • Designates Fishermen’s Markets as “food facilities” in the California Retail Food Code.
  • Exempts evisceration of whole raw fresh-caught fish at a Fishermen’s Market from the definition of food preparation to allow fresh-caught fish to be cleaned by the fishermen for direct sales to the public.
  • Establishes a separate Fishermen’s Market chapter in state law, specifying the operational requirements (modeled after requirements for Certified Farmers’ Markets) to allow commercial fishermen and aquaculturists to organize under a single permit holder for the market.
  • Clarifies that food facilities that sell certain products such as whole fresh-caught fish can have an open front.

If you’d like to support this legislation, please send a letter of support (like the sample letter below) to Speaker Atkins. Send letters to CA Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins. Some reasons to support Pacific to Plate AB 226:

  • Fishermen’s markets allow fishermen to sell local seafood direct to consumers – providing fresh seafood with a lower carbon footprint.
  • The Pacific-to-Plate legislation streamlines the permitting process, so that fishermen can sell direct to the public.
  • Fishermen’s markets provide a place for fishermen to collaborate and plan what they’ll fish – leading to more sustainable fishing practices, like fishing lightly across a wider variety of fish.
  • More fishermen’s markets means more fresh fish available at better prices to the consumer.
  • Fishermen’s markets, like farmers markets, connect the community to their food producers and the food producers to their community.
Send your letters to Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins by March 10, 2015:

Kids love fresh seafood!