Working for Good, Clean, Fair Food for All - Slow Food Urban San Diego Convivium of Slow Food International


Those funny persimmons…

Photo By: Kiyoshi Togashi courtesy of Epicurious.com

They are pumpkin orange, tomato round, and berry sweet. They are a mystery to many but once a slice of this unique fruit is picked off a plate at the farmer’s market and the tongue gets a taste of that subtly sweet flesh, there is no turning back: every fall you will look for those little globes of deliciousness gracing your favorite orchard’s table. You can add persimmons to that must-have list of other unique fruits like pomegranates and Asian pears (which are also in season right now).

So what to do with your bounty? If they make it home without you ravenously snacking on your stash, here’s a great salad from Epicurious.com to add a little healthy and locally sourced holiday cheer to your Thanksgiving table:

Rainbow Chopped Salad

Dressing:

  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
  • 1/2 tablespoon honey
  • 1/4 cup hazelnut oil or extra-virgin olive oil

Salad:

  • 6 cups chopped romaine hearts
  • 4 cups sliced red cabbage
  • 1 large Fuji apple, halved, cored, diced
  • 1 Asian pear, halved, cored, diced
  • 2 Fuyu persimmons, peeled, seeded, diced
  • 3/4 cup hazelnuts, toasted, husked, coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese (optional)

Dressing:
Whisk vinegar, shallot, and honey in small bowl to blend. Gradually whisk in oil. Season dressing to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Salad:
Combine romaine and next 6 ingredients in very large bowl; toss to blend. Add dressing and toss to coat.

Divide salad among plates. Sprinkle with blue cheese, if desired, and serve.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Read More http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Rainbow-Chopped-Salad-363733#ixzz2Cq4BuSCh

Pumpkin Padron Bisque

In celebration of Food Day (Week), Alchemy’s Chef Ricardo Heredia made a guest appearance at the Seeds@City Urban Farm stand last Thursday to give a scrumptious cooking demonstration in true Autumn spirit. Scoops of roasted pumpkin, charred Padron peppers, and silky cream filled his bubbling cauldron (stockpot) luring hungry students with the mouthwatering aroma.

A simplified version of the bisque served at Alchemy, he charred the peppers with a blowtorch (“Every poor college kid should have one!” he quipped), threw organic canned pumpkin into his Vitamix, and blended the produce with a generous dollop of heavy cream. Topped with smoked paprika oil and pepitas, students and faculty at City College raved over the free samples and beelined towards the farm stand to buy up the Padrons.

Thanks Chef Ricardo for reaching out to the community! It’s people like you who make Food Day exciting, informative, and delicious!

Here’s his recipe:

Pumpkin-Padron Bisque

Yield 4 qts

  • 3 ea. charred med. *Padron peppers *
  • 4 ea. cloves of garlic
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 ea. yellow onion
  • 2 lbs. cooked pumpkin
  • 1 cups sour cream
  • 1 quarts heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons salt

Method

Rough chop the onion and toss with olive oil cook in oven broiler along with the Padrons and garlic until charred and caramelized. Remove the seeds from the Padrons but leave the charred skin on. Puree all ingredients intermittently with one quart of the cream heated. Garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds and smoked paprika oil.

Paprika Oil

  • 1 cup pimenton (smoked paprika)
  • 4 cups rice oil ( or any oil of your choice)

Method

Put pimenton along with one cup of oil in a sauce pan. Cook on medium heat for two minutes stirring frequently until it begins to darken and give off a toasted aroma. Add remaining oil and cook on low heat until it starts to simmer. Remove from heat and let sit until cool approx. 1 hour. Strain through a fine mesh sieve.

** Substitute your pepper of choice**

To make vegan omit the cream and sour cream and use vegetable stock

One person’s junk…

Stinging nettle at Wild Willow Farm

Is another person’s treasure! You’ve heard that one before as you browsed through a particularly fruitful garage sale. A perfectly good bread machine? A ceramic bust of Mozart? A slightly rusty but still totally usable push lawn-mower? What were these sellers thinking? Of course you’ll take it all off their hands…

The same thing happens in the garden. Some of us see weeds, others culinary delights. Where I work at Seeds@City Urban Farm we have our fair share of delicious volunteer plants like dandelions, amaranth, lambs quarters, stinging nettle, and purslane. Some was sown on purpose long ago, some just shows up. Instead of pulling it all and throwing it in the compost pile, we share the nutritional value and delicious uses with our community through the CSA program and farm stand. If you don’t have your own garden to weed (and eat from), ask at the local farmers’ markets for some of those tasty greens.

Here’s a great article from the New York Times about a few of our favorites.

purslane vs snail