Working for Good, Clean, Fair Food for All - Slow Food Urban San Diego Convivium of Slow Food International


Save San Diego’s Sustainable Seafood

San Diego’s sustainable seafood needs your help. San Diego’s fishermen need your help. Our good, clean & fair seafood system needs your help.

The Port of San Diego plans to redevelop our Downtown waterfront, but the proposals they are considering, by and large, fall short of sustaining our local fishing industry. You can speak up and let them know that we support our fishermen and need a fishing harbor. No fishing harbor means no local fish. You can do two things to help:

  1. Send a letter to the Port of San Diego and ask them to support a healthy, local seafood system and a distinctly local Downtown waterfront. More details below.
  2. Attend the Port Commissioners’ workshop to review the proposals Wednesday, July 13th, 9AM. Provide public comment in support of our local fisheries beginning at 2:45PM. Details here.

Read San Diego fishermen’s Downtown waterfront vision

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Support good, clean & fair seafood for all San Diegans.

Help maintain our access to some of the most sustainable seafood in the world by sending a letter to the Port of San Diego. Points to include in letters and contact information for Port Commissioners and staff are below and downloadable here.

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Points to include in letters:

  • A world-class community fishing commercial fishing harbor on the Embarcadero is a crucial and beneficial part of the fabric of the waterfront and the San Diego community. Our fishing harbor and the people within provide food security, economic value, legal consistency, and strengthen connections to our history and culture.
  • We encourage the Port to work with the San Diego fishing community to ensure that their needs are incorporated into the redeveloped waterfront. Please ensure that San Diego fishing will have the infrastructure, visibility and community involvement it needs in order thrive.
  • San Diego fishermen provide food security. San Diegans want access to safe, secure and healthy food. While 90% of the U.S.’s seafood is imported, with most from unknown origins, San Diego fishermen provide a local source of traceable seafood. This seafood is a safe, secure, healthy and affordable option for the community, and is some of the most sustainable seafood in the world.
  • San Diego fishermen contribute economic Value. The San Diego fishing industry has an extensive economic value to our community and this should be maintained. The San Diego fishing industry supports 130 commercial fishing vessels, including crew members and their families. In the San Diego area, 2.3 million pounds of seafood were landed in 2014, at a value of $10.3 million. Our commercial fisheries bring other values to San Diego including: networks, stewardship, lifestyle, income, fishing expenses, gifting and trading seafood, culture and tradition, education, spiritual, intergenerational, and transportation.
  • The Port should maintain legal consistency. The Port should redevelop the waterfront in a manner consistent with local and State plans and acts that protect the coast and its people and consider proposals for Central Embarcadero development. Redevelopment should meet the requirements of the Unified Port of San Diego Master Plan and the Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Plan to maintain a working fishing harbor at this location; the State Land Commissions Public Trust Doctrine that holds the waterfront in trust for the people of California; and the Coastal Act that states that fishing harbors should be maintained.
  • We want to maintain our history and culture. San Diego wants fishing operations in sight. Downtown San Diego is the cultural and historical home of San Diego fishing. Young San Diegans need the opportunity to view fishing and consider it as a viable line of work in order to keep our food sources secure. Once fishing is not visible, it will disappear along with the food security, economic stability, jobs and local identity it provides.
  • Please keep our local sustainable seafood system within reach. San Diego deserves a thriving local food system, of which fishing is an integral and respected part. We want access to fresh, healthy, sustainably sourced seafood, that we can afford. A thriving fishing industry in Downtown San Diego is critical to this future.
  • Downtown San Diego, like many other downtowns, has its share of large hotels, chain and non-local retailers and restaurants, and a lack of fresh, locally sourced food. Redevelopment represents an opportunity to highlight San Diego’s local treasures and create a beautiful, unique, accessible, and purposeful world-class waterfront.
  • San Diego deserves a world-class, working waterfront. To accomplish this, we need a thriving fishing industry. Downtown San Diego can be known for its healthy, sustainable seafood; its strong fishing heritage; and its beautiful, fully operational fishing harbor accessible to all.

Support food security, economic value, our cultural identity. Support local fisheries. 

#knowyourfishermen

Email the San Diego Port Commissioners
Marshall Merrifield (Chairman)- City of San Diego
mmerrifield@portofsandiego.org
Robert “Dukie” Valderrama (Vice-Chairman)- National City
rvalderrama@portofsandiego.org
Rafael Castellanos (Secretary)- City of San Diego
rcastellanos@portofsandiego.org
Bob Nelson – City of San Diego
bnelson@portofsandiego.org
Ann Moore- Chula Vista
amoore@portofsandiego.org
Dan Malcolm – Imperial Beach
dmalcolm@portofsandiego.org
Garry J. Bonelli – Coronado
gbonelli@portofsandiego.org

Email the Port Staff
Jim Hutzelman jhutzelm@portofsandiego.org
Randa Coniglio rconigli@portofsandiego.org
Wendy Ong wong@portofsandiego.org
Penny Maus pmaus@portofsandiego.org
Sofia Bayardo sbayardo@portofsandiego.org

Red Sea Urchin

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Slow Fish 2016 – Building a Better Seafood System

by Sarah M. Shoffler, SFUSD Seafood Liaison

In March 2016, over 200 fishermen, fishmongers, chefs, scholars, activists, students and community leaders gathered in New Orleans for four days of stories, food, art and music. Slow Fish 2016 was glorious. We shared our successes and our challenges in striving for good, clean & fair seafood for all. Sarah tells us more about this event and how San Diegans can apply good, clean & fair values to our seafood consumption. 

“The world’s fisheries are in trouble. 70% are either exploited, overexploited or have already collapsed” is what media tells us. This leaves the impression that we manage our fisheries so poorly that we’ll soon empty the oceans of seafood. Not so.

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Slow Fish 2016 attendees at the Seafood Boil and Boucherie on Docville Farm, where Slow Fish met Slow Meat. Industrial agriculture is significantly affecting Louisiana wetlands, which are critical to healthy fish populations. Photo: E. Buchanan

In the U.S. at least, our fishermen are among the most stringently managed. If they catch too many fish or harm protected populations (e.g. dolphins or endangered turtles), we have to do something – shut down the fishery, or change fishing gear, season, location, etc. The number of fish populations overfished in the U.S. is decreasing, not increasing.

Here’s a more thorough treatment of the issue that explains why the doom-and-gloom narrative is wrong and destructive.

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Tuna canning demonstration at Slow Fish 2016. Photo: E. Buchanan

What can we do? How can we wade through the misinformation and support a healthy seafood system? Enter Slow Fish, a grassroots international campaign to promote good, clean & fair seafood. We do this while bringing joy to the efforts to restore marine ecosystems and support fishing communities. That’s a deep order, so how do we do it?

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UCSD student volunteer Catherine welcomes us to Slow Fish 2016. Photo: E. Buchanan

In March 2016, over 200 fishermen, fishmongers, chefs, scholars, activists, students and community leaders gathered in New Orleans for four days of stories, food, art and music. Slow Fish 2016 was glorious. We shared our successes and our challenges in striving for good, clean & fair seafood for all.

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Boiled Lousiana crawfish. Photo: S. Shoffler

Local attendees included:
Sea urchin fisherman and community leader, Peter Halmay, who shared how a fishermen’s market in San Diego was created;
Chef Drew Deckman of Deckman’s en el Mogor, a Slow Fish advocate who cooked and shucked his weight in oysters for us;
Scripps Institution of Oceanography student volunteers: Flora Drury, Kate Masury and Catherine Courtier, who’s masters projects focus on fishermen’s markets, value chains and sustainable seafood;
SFUSD member, Eric Buchanan, who volunteered as official event photographer;
SFUSD’s vice chair and seafood liaison Sarah Shoffler, who was on the event planning team with partners from across the U.S. plus Canada and Italy.

Performers of "Cry You One," opening Slow Fish 2016 with the story of Louisiana's disappearing wetlands, so critical to fisheries. Photo: E. Buchanan

Performers of “Cry You One,” opening Slow Fish 2016 with the story of Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands, so critical to fisheries. Photo: E. Buchanan

I met family fishermen from Florida to Alaska, who continuously adapt their practices to changing management and ecosystems. They fish in small boats. Or large. They use the most up to date gear with turtle excluder devices and pingers (to avoid dolphins). They fish weirs, fishing gear whose origin dates back to before the emergence of modern humans. They are young – I met a 20 year old woman named Erica from Nova Scotia, who fishes weirs with her father. They are not so young – San Diegan sea urchin diver Pete Halmay joined us and shared his story of starting San Diego’s first fishermen’s market – where fishermen sell their catch directly to the public.

Pete Halmay, San Diego sea urchin diver, at the Slow Fish 2016 day 3 venue – a food museum. Photo: E Buchanan

These people love the ocean and what it brings us.

Fishmongers from Moss Landing shared how they started a community supported fishery (CSF) and a “Bay-to-Tray” program where they provide bycatch from the black cod fishery to school lunch programs –animals that would otherwise be wasted. Another fisherman shared his story of building a business where he takes people fishing on San Francisco Bay and teaching them to cook what they eat. We heard so many big and small ways of supporting a healthy food system, one based on good, clean & fair seafood for all.

Slow Food Urban San Diego member, CHef Drew Deckman and Louisiana fishermen, Lance Nacio shucking oysters -- Baja Kumiai and Louisiana. Photo: S. Shoffler

Slow Food Urban San Diego member, Chef Drew Deckman and Louisiana fishermen, Lance Nacio shucking oysters — Baja Kumiai and Louisiana. Photo: S. Shoffler

I was buoyed to learn that efforts in San Diego to support our small-scale fisheries are seen as successes elsewhere. And that by supporting local fishermen with my business, I invest in families and the local economy as well as give hope to folks who are so often portrayed as the enemy to our marine ecosystem, when in fact they offer many of the solutions to sustain it.

SFUSD Slow Fish Plans

(1) Now: Connect local chefs directly to local fishermen – this is the best way to get the freshest most sustainable seafood on our restaurant plates. If any chefs would like to meet our local seafood producers, please get in touch.

(2) Soon: Collaborate with local chefs, fishermen, fishmongers and others to bring you Seafood Saturdays – a campaign to promote local US-caught seafood in San Diego and to teach San Diegans how to prepare, cook and enjoy the local bounty. Check us out at the Tuna Harbor pier starting April 16th.

(3) Future: Research barriers to keeping local seafood local. Why is the local catch sent outside the City, County and Country? How can we keep it here? Why should we?

(4) Future: Keep our waterfront a working waterfront. How can we maintain our cultural heritage as a fishing community? How can we revive it? How do we keep the harvest of this healthy and delicious resource in our community?

What’s a seafood lover to do?

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Slow Fish 2016 opening reception at the Mardi Gras Krewe du Vieux club house. Photo: E. Buchanan

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Young fishermen, Amanda and Spencer, sharing their story of bringing seafood to youth. Photo: E. Buchanan

Slow Fish 2016 fisherman and young winner of the rock, paper, scissors contest being lead by Slow Fish USA leader, Kevin.

Young Alaskan fisherman lead by Slow Fish USA leader, Kevin Scribner.

Baja Kumiai oysters. Photo: S. Shoffler

Baja Kumiai oysters shucked by Drew Deckman. Photo: S. Shoffler

Slow Fish 2016 attendees listening raptly to a discussion of fishery policy in one of our ever-changing venues. Photo: E. Buchanan

Slow Fish 2016 attendees listening raptly to a discussion of fishery policy in one of our ever-changing venues. Photo: E. Buchanan

Slow Food members from Austin, San Diego and New Orleans talking fish. Photo: M Lothrop

Slow Food volunteers from Austin, San Diego and New Orleans talking fish. Photo: M Lothrop

Fisherman Lance Nacio's Loisiana shrimp. Photo: E. Buchanan

Fisherman Lance Nacio’s Loisiana shrimp. Photo: E. Buchanan

Slow Sips March 5th @Tiger!Tiger!

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Join us for our first Slow Sips of the year. Meet our board and learn what’s up for 2016 in the Good, Clean & Fair Food for All world. Plus, meet the folks behind the meat at Tiger!Tiger! and their friendly bakers.

But wait, there’s more! Light snacks provided and SFUSD members get 10% off food and drinks. RAWR, indeed!

Slow Sips are networking and community-building events put on by Slow Food chapters. It’s one of the ways we celebrate food as a cornerstone of community.

Join the Facebook event.