Slow Sips: ‘Dreaming of a Vetter World’ Screening

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Join us on Thursday, November 8 at Tiger!Tiger! for happy hour drinks and food followed by a private screening of ‘Dreaming of a Vetter World’ at nearby Digital Gym. Stick around afterwards for a Q&A with filmmaker Bonnie Hawthorne, the Slow Food SD Board, and community partners working in regenerative agriculture.

Where: Tiger!Tiger! followed by Digital Gym

When: Thursday, November 8, 2018

Drinks from 5-7pm, film starts at 7.30pm

Reserve your ticket

About the Film

In 1953, Nebraska farmer Don Vetter suddenly stopped spraying his crops with chemicals. Disappointed by the results, he also saw how they stripped the goodness from his soil, contaminated the land and killed wildlife. From that moment, the Vetters made soil their most important ‘crop’, embarking on a decades-long experiment with sustainable agriculture, long before anyone else gave it a moment’s thought.   

At a time when interest in soil regeneration is growing, people are realizing what Don and his family have known for decades: that soil is the key to our survival.

Challenges Faced by Organic Farmers

This feature-length documentary shares the story of three generations of the Vetter family and the realities of being a small-scale farmer in the era of industrial agriculture. Peppered by interviews with organic leaders, farmers and scientists, you’ll learn about the less well known challenges faced by organic farmers surrounded by chemical agriculture.

A Story of Love, Hope and Place

In her debut movie, Bonnie blends beautiful cinematography, wry Midwestern humor, and a moving soundtrack to bring to life this story about doing what you know is right, against all odds.

See you there!

The Kumeyaay Nation of San Diego County and Baja California

The Kumeyaay people, comprised of 13 bands of the northern Iipay and southern Tipay reaching from North County San Diego into Baja California, endure and flourish across their binational territory.  Since the Spanish incursion into their territory in the late 18th century, they have been unrelenting in their advocacy for their sovereignty and cultural independence, and their lifeways are rich with stories, traditional knowledge, and community initiatives that ensure their self determination. From their language, to their crafts, to their foodways, Kumeyaay culture has endured and is continuing to thrive.

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Kumeyaay controlled lands, 1769 - 2000. Graphic by cultural expert Mike Connolly.

Museums and documentaries

A number of local groups such as the San Diego Archaeological Center, Friends of the Kumeyaay, and Mission Trails Regional Park have created venues, including libraries and interpretive museum exhibits dedicated to communicating Kumeyaay culture to residents and visitors to the San Diego area. At the same time, the Kumeyaay bands themselves have also created their own high quality cultural sites, such as those at the Barona Museum, as well as at the newly opened Sycuan Cultural Center. The Sycuan Cultural Center grounds also host Kumeyaay Community College, which both hosts its own educational programs and has worked together with Cuyamaca College to create the first accredited Kumeyaay Studies Associate’s Degree.

Also available are several well-produced documentaries on Kumeyaay culture, including the KPBS film First People, Kumeyaay and Our People. Our Culture. Our History., focusing on the story of the Sycuan band.

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Kumeyaay tribespeople, as well of those of other heritages, come together to support cultural revitalization.

Beyond San Diego County, Tecate, Mexico hosts the Museo Comunitario Tecate (Tecate Community Museum), hosting exhibits, an ethnobotanical garden, and a gift store that focus on Kumeyaay - spelled Kumiai in Spanish - culture. The museum is “dedicated to fostering greater understanding of the cultural, historical and natural heritage of Tecate, Baja California, Mexico and the larger binational region to which it belongs.”

San Diego County hosts the largest number of tribal reservations of any county in the United States. The Kumeyaay Nation bands have created and operate their own public services, income generating activities, and vast cultural resources that benefit not only themselves, but all San Diegans.

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Stan Rodriguez (left, Santa Ysabel) and Alex Hunter (middle, Jamul) interview elders from Baja California’s San Jose de la Zorra reservation on a language immersion trip.

Demonstration sites

In addition to museums, documentaries and other media resources that relay Kumeyaay culture, there are also demonstration sites that focus on Kumeyaay ethnobotany (the study of the use of plants by traditional people). The Worldbeat Cultural Center, host of the upcoming Good Food Community Fair, hosts a Kumeyaay ethnobotany garden, as does Indigenous Regeneration in North County San Diego, which also emphasizes food cultivation, medicinal farming, culture and eco-village education programs.

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Baja California’s nonprofit organization INAH (Insituto Nacional de Antropología y Historia) offers interpretive and protection of the extensive cave paintings at La Rumorosa’s El Vallecito, Seen here is the astronomical glyph of Shally (“The Hand”), known as “Leo” in western astronomy.

Cultural Advocacy

From San Diego’s inland deserts, to the Shores of the South Bay, and now to the valleys of East County, the Kumeyaay Nation proactively protects their cultural heritage from further incursion by development projects through activism, protest and advocacy for their human rights. They gather regularly at various sites of cultural and ecological significance throughout San Diego County that face negative impacts from private and public developers.

The Kumeyaay people continue to have much to teach the over 3 million non-native San Diegans who call this county home, as well as those across the border in Mexico. As residents on their land, we would do well to make good on the many opportunities available to not only learn about their culture, but do so in relationship with them, and join them in advocacy for their cultural renewal.

Story and photos by @colinhrichard

Back to the Land...and Beyond

Dan Mueller, Food Justice Co-Chair

with contributions from Colin H. Richard, Ark of Taste Chair

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As a community organizer, it’s often difficult to remove the socio-critical lens through which I view the world, its problems and their potential solutions. With our Good Food Community Fair themed “Back to the Land” right around the corner, I’ve been thinking a lot about how the ideals behind such a phrase translate across various contexts.

I talk a little about overcoming the cognitive dissonance as a black woman volunteering on an organic farm here and have since broadened my inquiry to include those who cultivate diverse meanings within the larger agrarian movement.

“Going”

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For many San Diegans, this can look similar to the “Back to the Land” movement of the ‘60s: engagements with several of the bustling community gardens around the city or any of the more than 6,600 farms peppered throughout San Diego county--more than any other county in the United States.

In North County, it was the unique experience of “remembering Somalia and what we were doing there,” for a group of Somali Bantu refugees who were learning local growing techniques and organic farming methods from the International Rescue Committee in hopes of creating businesses to help them support their families

(Howard Lipin, San Diego Union-Tribune).  

Though an avenue to self-sustenance along with reconnecting to culture and a way of life involuntarily left behind, this project’s brevity reflects the struggles growers and organizers still face, despite the growing public interest in initiatives around civic ecology.

“Giving”

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Looking deeper highlights the importance of regenerative agricultural practices, such as those of the Kumeyaay Nation. They are stewards for preserving native food heritage and also guardians of the narratives about fostering mutually beneficial relationships with Mother Earth.  

The visions inspired by Indigenous Regeneration projects remind us of the positive impacts of simple, intentional concepts like habitat restoration, sustainable living techniques and recycling for empowering our communities.  

In an era of environmental degradation, it is honoring the traditions of those most harmoniously coexisting with the land that will facilitate the rebirth of the biodiversity truly making the greater San Diego region a haven for all life.

When we talk about going back to the land, it is essential to acknowledge that for some it is a choice offering nourishment and respite from urban activity and for others it is an overdue return to what was stripped or taken away.

When we speak about giving back to the land and acting accordingly, we’re not only feeding the world. We’re preserving and institutionalizing the traditional ecological knowledge for recreating a planet that is good, clean and fair for all.

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To learn more about the ways in which our communities can work toward a better food system in and around San Diego, join Slow Food for our Fifth Annual Good Food Community Fair Saturday, October 6th, 2018, from 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM PDT at the WorldBeat Cultural Center.

We will be bringing attention to the consequences of industrialized agricultural practices and discuss how regeneration can guide the revival of our ecosystem while celebrating the ways in which we can give back to the land and manifest abundance.


#GoodFoodFair




Join Us At The Fifth Annual Good Food Community Fair October 6th @ WorldBeat Cultural Center

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Join Slow Food Urban San Diego for our Fifth Annual Good Food Community Fair Saturday, October 6th, 2018, from 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM PDT at the WorldBeat Cultural Center.

The Good Food Community Fair is Slow Food Urban San Diego's largest annual event, bringing together the people and organizations desiring a Good, Clean & Fair food system. Come engage with us as we enjoy the culinary demos, family-friendly activities, expert panel discussions, garden activities, and of course...food!

Each year, this event inspires and highlights ways in which the community can work toward a better food system in and around San Diego. This year, we want to bring attention to the consequences of biodiversity and habitat loss due to industrialized agricultural practices and discuss how regenerative agriculture can guide the restoration of our food system and environment. We will celebrate ways in which we can be more connected to our food and soil and how we can work together to bring abundance back to the land.

Tickets: Encouraged donation of $7 pre-sale, $10 at the door. To RSVP and donate, click here

FAQs

Are there ID or minimum age requirements to enter the event?
Everyone is welcome - bring the family!

How can I become a vendor or sponsor?

Our applications are open through August 22nd. Please fill out our Partner Registration Form.

What are my transportation/parking options for getting to and from the event?
Free parking is available across the street from the World Beat Center, at 2004 Park Boulevard. The location is also served by the 7 & 215 MTS bus routes.

What's the refund policy?
Sorry, no refunds.

Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?
You do not need to bring your printed ticket. In fact, we'd prefer you save the paper.

Is it ok if the name on my ticket or registration doesn't match the person who attends?
Yes, if you can no longer attend the event feel free to share your ticket.

Interested in Joining Our Board? We Have Open Opportunities!

Are you organized, passionate and inspired to support Good, Clean & Fair food for all? Then we want you! Seeking detail-oriented, energetic leaders and rising leaders to join the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board. All positions are voluntary.

Open Positions Are:

Fund Development Chair
The Fund Development Chair creates, maintains and updates an inventory of resources of potential donors and sponsors; develops and implements fundraising campaigns to be supported by the Board; and applies for grant as appropriate. The Fund Development Chair may form a committee.

Volunteer Coordinator
The Volunteer Chair coordinates Slow Food Urban San Diego outreach at community events, including soliciting for volunteers, organizing shifts and communicating w/ the event organizer to arrange for logistics. Events may include Slow Sips, festivals and fairs, and local food and farm related events hosted by other mission-aligned organizations.

Submit your application, including a resume/bio and letter of interest here.

Applications are open on a rolling basis until filled.

To be eligible, you must have or obtain a Slow Food membership. Terms of office are two years, with reelection possible for additional terms but not to exceed eight years of service before a one year hiatus. All positions require leadership, organization and communication skills as well as initiative.

Meet Your New 2018 Board!

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Meet Slow Food Urban San Diego’s 2018 Board of Directors. We are all volunteers dedicated to good, clean and fair food for all throughout the San Diego region. We are stewards of good food and healthy, thriving communities in many areas of our lives.

  • Kathryn Rogers, Co-Chair
  • Lisa Joy, Co-Chair
  • Stephanie Parker, Secretary
  • Darcy Shiber-Knowles, Treasurer
  • Julie Diaz, Education Chair
  • Ariel Hamburger, Policy Chair
  • Rachel Hommel, Communications Chair
  • Jennifer Ikoma, Membership Coordinator
  • Tom Kiely, Slow Beer Chair
  • Michelle Poliner, Good Food Community Fair Chair
  • Sarah Shoffler, Seafood Liaison

Click here to read bios and for contact information.

Open Opportunities to Join the Board of Directors!

Are you organized, passionate and inspired to support Good, Clean & Fair food for all? Then we want you! Seeking detail-oriented, energetic leaders and rising leaders to join the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board. All positions are voluntary.

Open Positions Are:

Good Food Community Fair Co-Chair
The Good Food Community Fair Co-Chair is an organized event planner that is passionate about building community around good, clean & fair food for all. The Co-Chair will work with the current Good Food Community Fair Chair to support committee meetings and organize/manage logistics, fundraising opportunities and special programming for the annual Good Food Community Fair. The Good Food Community fair is a gathering of good, clean & fair organizations and a celebration of local food and craft drinks with cooking demos, art, discussion panels and more. For more information visit: http://goodfoodfair.com/

Farm Liaison/Ark of Taste Chair
The Farm Liaison/Ark of Taste Chair works to link Slow Food Urban San Diego with the local farming community and recommends strategies for the Chapter to advocate for and support farmers. The Farm Liaison sits on the Slow Food California Ark of Taste Committee (~2 conference calls a month and review of applications to the Ark) and to support Ark of Taste Programming and recognition in San Diego. The Farm Liaison may form a committee.

Communications Committee Co-Chair
The Communications Committee Chair facilitates Chapter communications through website maintenance, newsletters, social media and networking, and ensures consistency of communications to members, media and the community. The Communications Chair oversees the Communications Committee and supports the Chapter Co-Chairs in tracking Slow Food California, Slow Food USA and Slow Food International activities of interest and in sharing SFUSD activities with other Slow Food entities. The Committee oversees marketing and getting the word out regarding Chapter activities. Strong writing, editing and communications skills are required for success in this position.

Fund Development Chair
The Fund Development Chair creates, maintains and updates an inventory of resources of potential donors and sponsors; develops and implements fundraising campaigns to be supported by the Board; and applies for grant as appropriate. The Fund Development Chair may form a committee.

Volunteer Coordinator
The Volunteer Chair coordinates Slow Food Urban San Diego outreach at community events, including soliciting for volunteers, organizing shifts and communicating w/ the event organizer to arrange for logistics. Events may include Slow Sips, festivals and fairs, and local food and farm related events hosted by other mission-aligned organizations.

Submit your application, including a resume/bio and letter of interest here.

Applications are open on a rolling basis until filled.

To be eligible, you must have or obtain a Slow Food membership. Terms of office are two years, with reelection possible for additional terms but not to exceed eight years of service before a one year hiatus. All positions require leadership, organization and communication skills as well as initiative.

BrightSide Produce San Diego: A New Beacon for Local Food Deserts

BrightSide Produce San Diego envisions a future where everyone in San Diego has access to affordable, fresh fruits and vegetables. It’s a bold vision, but the student-run, social venture has already made huge strides toward its goal. Launched in June 2017 by Dr. Iana Castro, a marketing professor at San Diego State University (SDSU), and Rafael Castro, BrightSide serves as a produce distributor that reaches food insecure customers in underserved and university communities. 

Currently, it delivers fresh produce to nine community stores in National City weekly by “breaking bulk” and giving stores the flexibility to buy the varieties and quantities of fruits and vegetables that are appropriate for the stores at low prices, without minimum order requirements. 

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In addition to its store deliveries, BrightSide has an SDSU Buyers Club, which is a convenient, on-campus option for affordable produce. SDSU community members can sign up for a produce package based on how many fruits and vegetables they would like to receive each week, and can pick it up at SDSU Farmers Market every Thursday between 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Outside of its deliveries, BrightSide has established itself as an important part of the sustainable movement at SDSU. It’s housed under the Center for Regional Sustainability (CRS), an organization dedicated to advancing sustainability through regional collaborations in higher education, research, stewardship and outreach. With the support of CRS, BrightSide is run primarily by students from Dr. Castro’s “Marketing and Sales for Social Impact” course, which gives them the opportunity to apply their skills to a real business and effect change in areas where it’s needed most. Along with running the business, students have the opportunity to share BrightSide’s mission at sustainability-themed events both locally and nationally. 

To keep up with BrightSide as it continues to make its impact in the San Diego region and beyond, please visit BrightSide’s website or follow BrightSide on Instagram or Facebook.

Apply to Join the Slow Food Urban Board in 2018!

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Are you organized, passionate and willing to help with the nitty gritty of accomplishing Good, Clean & Fair food for all? Then we want you! Seeking detail-oriented, energetic leaders to round out the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board. All positions are voluntary. Submit your application, including a resume/bio and letter of interest here. Applications are open on a rolling basis. Apply as early as possible. The first round of interviews will be scheduled for the evening of December 7, 2017. The final application deadline is 11:59 p.m. on December 13, 2017.

To be eligible, you must have or obtain a Slow Food membership. Terms of office are two years, with reelection possible for additional terms but not to exceed eight years of service before a one year hiatus. About half our positions are open each year. Candidates elected will start in January 2018 and serve through December 2019 in the positions. All positions require leadership, organization and communication skills as well as initiative.

Position Descriptions:

Chair The Chair liaises with the Regional Governor, the Slow Food USA national office, and other Chapter Leaders in the region.  The Chair creates meeting agendas, runs general meetings, acts as one of at least two signing authorities for the Chapter bank account, acts as primary contact for the group, oversees the activities of the Chapter, and ensures that the Chapter is meeting all annual requirements. Co-Chairs may share the above duties. Candidates must have served on the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board for a minimum of one year.

Vice Chair The Vice Chair works with the current Board Chair to administrate the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board of Directors and maintain chapter standing. Candidates must have served on the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board for a minimum of one year and agree to assume the Board Chair position in January 2019 for at least a one-year term.

Secretary The Secretary records minutes during monthly Board Meetings, administers annual elections, coordinates a schedule of interviews for Board positions, and provides some administrative support to the Board.

Treasurer The Treasurer maintains the books for the organization, handles expense reimbursements, accounts payable, and annual filings. The treasurer is responsible for leading the budgeting process and providing financial guidance to the Board, as well as presenting a Treasurer’s report at monthly board meetings. A working knowledge of Quickbooks is desired but training by the outgoing treasurer will be provided if necessary.

Education Committee Chair The Education Committee Chair provides the San Diego community with education and enrichment opportunities that connect students of all ages to Good, Clean and Fair food. The Chair supports existing programs, including Edible San Diego for Kids Publication, Taste Education Programs, as well as educational programming for families and adults. The Chair also liaises with Slow Food University Chapter(s). The Chair oversees the Education Committee, which meets monthly, striving to engage and include Slow Food Urban San Diego’s membership as much as possible.

Food Justice Committee Chair The Food Justice Committee Chair collaborates with San Diego food access/security organizations,environmental and other organizations to promote sustainable agriculture, urban farming and access to good, clean and fair food for ALL. The Chair oversees the Food Justice Committee, which meets monthly, striving to engage and include Slow Food Urban San Diego’s membership and community members/leaders as much as possible.

Farm Liaison/Ark of Taste Chair The Farm Liaison/Ark of Taste Chair works to link Slow Food Urban San Diego with the local farming community and recommends strategies for the Chapter to advocate for and support farmers. The Farm Liaison sits on the Slow Food California Ark of Taste Committee (~2 conference calls a month and review of applications to the Ark) and to support Ark of Taste Programming and recognition in San Diego. The Farm Liaison may form a committee.

Communications Committee Chair The Communications Committee Chair facilitates Chapter communications through website maintenance, newsletters, social media and networking, and ensures consistency of communications to members, media and the community. The Communications Chair oversees the Communications Committee and supports the Chapter Co-Chairs in tracking Slow Food California, Slow Food USA and Slow Food International activities of interest and in sharing SFUSD activities with other Slow Food entities. The Committee oversees marketing and getting the word out regarding Chapter activities. Strong writing, editing and communications skills are required for success in this position.

Good Food Community Fair Co-Chair The Good Food Community Fair Co-Chair is an organized event planner that is passionate about building community around good, clean & fair food for all. The Co-Chair will work with the current Good Food Community Fair Chair to support committee meetings and organize/manage logistics, fundraising opportunities and special programming for the annual Good Food Community Fair. The Good Food Community fair is a gathering of good, clean & fair organizations and a celebration of local food and craft drinks with cooking demos, art, discussion panels and more. For more information visit: http://goodfoodfair.com/

Fund Development Chair The Fund Development Chair creates, maintains and updates an inventory of resources of potential donors and sponsors; develops and implements fundraising campaigns to be supported by the Board; and applies for grant as appropriate. The Fund Development Chair may form a committee.

Seafood Liaison The Seafood Liaison works to link Slow Food Urban San Diego with the local fishing community and recommends strategies for the Chapter to advocate for and support fishermen. The Seafood Liaison may form a committee.

Volunteer Coordinator The Volunteer Chair coordinates Slow Food Urban San Diego outreach at community events, including soliciting for volunteers, organizing shifts and communicating w/ the event organizer to arrange for logistics. Events may include Slow Sips, festivals and fairs, and local food and farm related events hosted by other mission-aligned organizations.

Membership Coordinator The Membership Coordinator oversees all things membership. S/he maintains and updates the Chapter’s membership list and leads in recruiting and retaining members; reports membership status at each board meeting; organizes membership drives and leads in planning Slow Food Urban San Diego’s “Slow Sips” events. The Membership Coordinator also maintains relationships with our Member Benefit Partners and continues to build the Member Benefit Program. The Membership Coordinator may develop and coordinate additional programs to build the Chapter membership and may form a committee.

Thank You for Joining Us at Good Food Community Fair!

The times challenge us. Slow Food Urban San Diego is grateful for our community - you uplift us in times like these and help to ground us in others. Thank you for your important contributions to our Good Food Community Fair: True Cost of Food and to our local food system. Thank you for sharing your wisdom, skills, knowledge, sense of hope, resiliency, successes, humor and delicious food and drinks.

This year's Fair celebrated how we are addressing the True Cost of Food in our region and acknowledged the work we have yet to do.

We discussed the true cost of food and farm labor, sustainable seafood, wasted food, soil health and land management, preserving cultural traditions and more. Thank you for sharing your stories and local treats, for teaching us about heirloom seeds and gyotaku, how to prepare "three-sisters," and how to connect to our farmers and fishermen and support healthy food systems. Slow Food looks forward to continuing the effort with you, our community. Thank you to all who contributed and volunteered, and all who attended, and to the WorldBeat Cultural Center for being our gracious host.

We're grateful to our generous sponsors who made it possible to charge only a "suggested donation," so that we can truly bring the Slow Food mission of good, clean and fair food to ALL. Creating opportunities to connect that are accessible is important to us.

Thank you to all who attended and partook of this community event. If you missed this year's good, clean and fair food fun, you can catch the next one in 2018. And of course, you can find us planting, eating, learning, teaching, connecting, cooking and expanding community with our partners in the meantime.

From all of us at Slow Food Urban San Diego, eat well, grow well, and be well.

What is the WorldBeat Cultural Center?

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Slow Food Urban San Diego is excited to host this year’s Good Food Community Fair at the WorldBeat Cultural Center in Balboa Park. The Good Food Community Fair is our largest annual gathering of food activists, producers and purveyors. This year we’re integrating the theme of ‘The True Cost and Value of Food’ into the day’s activities. We hope to bring awareness to the parts of the food system people don’t see, good and bad, and to focus on food justice concerns. With this in mind we couldn’t think of a better place to host than the WorldBeat Cultural Center (WBC).

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The WorldBeat Center is a non-profit multi-cultural arts organization committed to “healing the world through music, art, dance, education and sustainability” housed in a repurposed 1-million gallon water tower. They provide programs and services that nurture the spirit of children, elderly and everyone in between. Ultimately, they seek to heal the world by creating unity through diversity. Its doors are open every day to all people, regardless of color or creed, as a place to celebrate all cultures, art, music, dance, and people.

THE EDUCATION GARDEN

One of the many beautiful assets of this venue is the Children’s Peace Garden. This native garden is a favorite location for school garden projects, nutritional education programs, summer camps, field trips, and partnerships with local organizations dedicated to food security. Through this garden, the WBC  raises awareness around sustainability, urban wildlife, conservation, and urban gardening teaching inner city children and adults about recycling, composting, gardening and bird watching.

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The WBC utilizes this space to educate the public about the role of plants in society today along with the relationship of plants in the local and global indigenous cultures of the past. In 2015, in coalition with the local Kumeyaay, the World Beat Center embarked on a multi-level terraced garden of endemic and indigenous plants and vegetables that are part of the Kumeyaay lasting traditions.

THE SUSTAINABLE BUILDING

Not only is the building constructed of a repurposed water tower it’s sustainably run with LEED Certification, solar lighting fixtures, recycling and composting programs & handi-capable bathroom facilities.

With the inside walls covered in murals by local artists brightly commemorating important leaders and historical cultures, there are multiple galleries and small shops within the building where healthy local foods are served, locally-sourced goods are sold, and a gallery of art and artifacts is displayed. Flags of all nations fly from the ceiling while the stage and dancefloor have hosted hundreds of famous and upcoming acts, artists, and events to the delight of tens of thousands of fans and attendees.

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Known throughout California and Mexico for its exterior murals celebrating Egyptian, African, and Indigenous Cultures, the WorldBeat Center is leading as one of the most-important multicultural art and event centers in San Diego and we are proud to collaborate with the WBC and host the 2017 Good Food Community Fair in their space. We look forward to seeing you there!

Learn More about the Fair Here:  www.goodfoodfair.com

And get your tickets here (Only a $5 Suggested Donation!) 

Sincerely,

Michelle PolinerGood Food Community Fair Chair

Special Thanks to the WorldBeat Center Website and Facebook page for the photos used in this post. 

2017 Good Food Community Fair October 1st @ the World Beat Center

Get your tickets today!

Slow Food Urban San Diego brings together the largest collection of food system advocates in San Diego County: The 4th annual Good Food Community Fair. Come to the Worldbeat Center on Sunday, October 1st from 11am - 3pm as we celebrate all things slow and expand the community table to everyone interested in exploring the Good, Clean, and Fair food movement in San Diego.

The fair is part festival, part conference, part food-stravaganza. Enjoy culinary demos and panel discussions while sampling delicious libations and tasty treats from local food purveyors, tour the first sustainable, edible garden in Balboa park, meet local organizations dedicated to food justice, and learn about the true cost and value of food from some of the most prominent thought leaders in the entire San Diego region.

Programming will highlight and celebrate our community's successes in fair food and ways we can work toward a more just and regenerative food system for all people, animals, and the land.

Food Justice Policy Lead - seeking volunteers

SFUSD is looking for a Policy Lead for our Food Justice Committee. This volunteer position will help identify local policy issues of interest to SFUSD and the local food/farm/fishermen community and lead in advocacy efforts around them including awareness building, building strategic partnerships, attending town halls, organizing community meetings, etc. If you are detail oriented, passionate about food justice, a strong leader/advocate and enjoy digging into policy, we want to hear from you. Organization and writing skills a plus. This would also be a great position for someone looking to gain non-profit organizational, advocacy, or community organizer experience. We see this as a position for growth in our organization, possibly leading to a board position. All SFUSD volunteers enjoy and experience a community around food. Time commitment: flexible.
 
To apply, send us a short description of why you want to get involved and how you would make a great Policy Lead to: info at slowfoodurbansandiego dot org
 
Our mission: Slow Food Urban San Diego seeks to create connections, and strengthens community around issues of critical importance - including environment, health, culture and equity - to San Diego’s food system. Through educational programming, community outreach, awareness campaigns, and social gatherings, we unify food growers, harvesters, fishermen, makers, eaters and drinkers around a shared vision of good, clean and fair food system for all San Diegans.

 

Scholarships to Slow Food Nations

 
Slow Food Urban San Diego is pleased to offer up to 2 scholarships for local food system leaders to attend Slow Food Nations in Denver, CO on July 14-16, 2017. To be eligible, applicants must meet the following criteria:
 
Applications due no later than 10 p.m. PT on June 9th.
 

1. Active participant in San Diego's local food system (farmer, fisherman, chef, educator), and committed to good, clean and fair food for all San Diegans.

 
2. Available to attend Slow Food Nations in Denver, CO for the complete conference (arriving no later than the evening of July 14th and staying through the evening on July 16th).
 
3. Committed to working a 2-hour slot at the Slow Food California booth during the conference with a Slow Food Urban San Diego member to share information with attendees about San Diego food system efforts related to your subject matter of expertise. We will help you prepare and connect with others attending. 
 
4. Available to attend a Slow Food Urban San Diego board meeting in late summer/early fall 2017 to share key takeaways from the conference, and committed to attending at least one Slow Food community gathering this fall to share related info to our local food system.
 
5. Currently involved or interested in getting more involved with Slow Food Urban San Diego committee meetings or other supporting efforts.
 
Applications due no later than 10 p.m. PT on June 9th.
 

APPLY NOW >>>

Scholarship includes reimbursement of up to $1,000 for itemized travel expenses including airfare, lodging, food, conference fees and transportation, all of which much be coordinated in communication with a Slow Food Urban San Diego Board Member. All applications will be reviewed by the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board, and selected applicants will be notified via email no later than June 16th
 

Meet Your Fishermen

Their days usually start with listening to the weather. And are filled with doing what they love: fishing. Not slave to traffic patterns so much as the winds and currents, they harvest the food we eat in ever changing conditions.

Meet our fishermen on Feb 25th at an evening of local seafood & local wine!  Sea bass and box crab caught by San Diego's fishermen  and crafted into delicacies by MIHO Gastrotruck Wine produced by J*Brix

Seafood Demonstrations by the pros!

San Diego’s fishermen* harvest a diverse array of species: from swordfish, the most cunning of catches, to sea urchins, the sessile ocean starbursts. From 60+ species of rockfish which most restaurants call snapper to opah, a warm-blooded newcomer on the San Diego seafood scene with three distinct cuts of meat ranging from the fatty belly to the beef-like abductor muscle. Plus albacore, sardine, snails, whelks, black cod, octopus, spot prawns and more. The list of our local abundance goes on.

Fukushima and son and fish

San Diego is a unique location for the seafood industry in the world. We have a large diversity of year-round species. We have seasonal migrations of pelagic fish. And we have weather that makes seafood available year round.” – Kelly Fukushima, first generation San Diego fishermen.

On Saturday, February 25th, San Diegans have the opportunity to meet some of our local independent fishermen. The folks who chose a life of constant change – weather, regulations and fish availability – to provide our food. Slow Food celebrates these food producers. Box crab demonstrations all night and sea bass breakdown at 7pm. 

Kelli and Dan Major Fishing Vessel: Plan B Fishes: Box crab and just about anything available from Point Conception to the Mexico border and out 200 miles – lobster, octopus, whelk, rockfish, bonito, yellowtail…

Kelly Fukushima Fishing Vessel: Three Boys Fishes: swordfish, squid, crab, lobster, seabass, groundfish

Antonio Estrada Fishing Vessel: Caroline Louise Fishes: sea bass, including the one we’ll be eating on Sat

U.S. fisheries are among the most stringently regulated in the world.

“When San Diegans eat seafood from California fishermen, they are making a great choice for sustainable, responsible seafood and they are supporting artisanal fishing families.” – Kelly Fukushima

Box crab, harvested by Dan Major.

*Most people who fish commercially, whether man or woman, prefer the term fisherman over fisher, fisherwoman, etc.

And Evening with San Diego’s Independent Fishermen and Small-Production Winemakers

Slow Food Urban San Diego invites you to a Slow Fish & Slow Wine event featuring small-production winemakers and San Diego's independent fishermenHometown heroes MIHO Catering Co. will provide sea-to-street cuisine on-site with support from Hostess Haven, who’ll be handling the décor and look of the evening. The night will feature seafood demonstrations by the fishermen who caught the night’s sustainable fish as well as tunes, visuals, and antics provided by the Wine Not? team. 

GET TICKETS HERE

This February 25th, Wine Not?, the L.A.-based event and lifestyle unit of Bon Appétit Wine Editor Marissa A. Ross and event producer Evan Enderle, comes to San Diego in support of Slow Food Urban San Diego and J. Brix Wines. 

The event takes place from 6 to 9pm on the 25th. Tickets are $25 and include admission, wine tasting and small bites. Advance purchase is strongly recommended as space is limited. Tickets are available via WineNOT. Proceeds will benefit SFUSD’s programs to promote good, clean & fair seafood in San Diego.   The Rose is located at 2219 S. 30th Street and can be reached via telephone at 619.281.0718.