News

Join SFUSD on August 13 at Suzie's Farm for a Sunset Concert

13483121_10154494699549505_3712863512722925658_o Ready for some summertime fun? Spend a carefree evening at Suzie’s Farm enjoying warm summer breezes, a golden sunset and listening to the dreamy music of Mr. Gregory Page.

Suzies Farm is offering a special field tour starting at 3pm as an add-on. This will also ensure you are one of the first in line when doors open so you'll grab a great spot!

Golden Coast Mead will be on tap. This event is partnering with Mindful Fitness. A portion of proceeds will benefit Slow Food URBAN San Diego, so come on out and show your support.

$27 open seating (bring your own chair/blanket) registration in advance $40 reserved seating for picnic tables limited availability

Get tickets here. PLEASE NOTE: No sales at door.

Facebook event page

SFUSD Welcomes New Board Members

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The pineapple has long been a symbol of welcome in the Americas. Here we use it to welcome our new board members. SFUSD welcomes three new board members this month: Darcy Shiber-Knowles, Lisa Joy and Stephanie Parker. Our full roster for 2016 is listed below. We've reorganized the board, collapsing and expanding some positions. We look forward to working towards a Good, Clean & Fair San Diego food system and sharing with our San Diego community this coming year! Stay tuned for upcoming celebrations and efforts.

Rachel Helmer - Chair Sarah Shoffler - Vice Chair & Communications Coordinator Dana Palermo - Secretary Darcy Shiber-Knowles - Treasurer Kathryn Rogers - Food Justice Chair & Outreach Coordinator Tania Alatorre - Good Food Community Fair & Volunteer Coordinator Stephanie Parker - Farm Liaison & Ark of Taste Chair Lisa Joy - Education Chair

Learn more about them here.

We also extend our warmth and gratitude to the board members who recently stepped down: Jennifer Leong, Chelsea Coleman, Owen Salerno, Lydia Wisz, Aundrea Dominguez, Jessica Barlow, Christina Nelson and Adina Batnitzky. We so appreciate your contributions and leadership over the past several years and know that our future accomplishments will rest on the shoulders of your efforts.

Interested in joining our board? We still have room for a Communications Chair, Fundraising Chair and Membership Chair. Learn more about these positions here.

Girl Next Door Honey Pollinates Hearts and Minds

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By Sarah M. Shoffler, SFUSD Board of Directors

Bees are critical to pollinating plants and to growing thousands of fruits and vegetables that we eat. They are the only insect who make food that humans eat. But since the 1990s, beekeepers around the world have noticed bee colonies are disappearing. Added to that, droughts mean less access to their food supply. These things together spell trouble for these amazing five-eyed, honey-producing critters.

DID YOU KNOW? There are three types of bees: worker, drone and queen. All worker bees are females. Their wings beet 200 times per second or 12,000 beats per minute. The average worker bee produces about 1/12th of a tablespoon of honey in her lifetime. Bees communicate through pheromones and dances. Plus watch this.

Hillary Kearney of Girl Next Door Honey

But you don’t have to convince Hilary Kearney, Owner of Girl Next Door Honey, of the importance of bees. Her whole business is grounded in making bees accessible to people on every level.

“First and foremost I am educating people about bees and I find that they are often less afraid of them once they have a better understanding of what they do. I like to think of it as 'pollinating hearts and minds,” says Hilary. She does this by: teaching classes on backyard hives, managing home hives, relocating hives, teaching children about bees and giving Beehive Tours to the public. These efforts, she feels, will broaden bee knowledge among the public and lessen people’s fear of bees, which are critical to “engaging people with bees and on a larger scale their local food and ecosystem.”

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Hilary cares about her bees. Under normal conditions, bees will produce excess honey, enough to supply us humans with the sweet stuff and still feed themselves. But during a drought, there are fewer flowers, which means less nectar, which the bees need in order to make honey. So they may not be able produce enough for themselves and may have to work harder and travel further just to find the nectar. To support her bees, who rely on honey as their only food, Hilary doesn’t harvest honey during a drought. So when people buy honey from her, they can be assured that the bees it was taken from have enough food and are not starving.

Hillary tending her bees.

In addition, the drought has weakened the wild colonies in the area. They are producing smaller and weaker swarms (when a queen leaves a colony with worker bees to form a new colony). “When I do a bee rescue it takes more effort and resources to keep those bees alive and healthy” she says. Wondering what you can do to support bees?

HOW TO HELP BEES:

  • Avoid neonicotinoids in pesticides. These are thought to weaken bees’ immune system and make bees vulnerable to disease, parasites, extreme weather, viruses, poor nutrition, and other stressors.
  • Plant organic bee-friendly flowers, like California poppy, citrus, sage, sunflowers and others listed here.
  • Make a bee drinking fountain: fill a baking dish or pet water bowl with pebbles or marbles and water. The bees will stand on the marbles while they drink, without drowning.

To learn more about bees, honey, beekeeping and how to help bees, you can check out Girl Next Door’s partnership with Suzie's Farm and their new monthly Beehive Tours. You’ll be able to suit up and go into a beehive with Hilary. Or, come check her and our other bee-positive partners out at the Good Food Community Fair, Sunday, October 11th.

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Join the SFUSD Board of Directors

Slow Food Urban San Diego is soliciting applications for our Board of Directors. If you are interested in joining our Board, please email a brief bio and letter of interest indicating the position in which you are interested in to info@slowfoodurbansandiego.org by October 15th. In-person interviews will be scheduled in late October. Join us in supporting good, clean & fair food in our community. Positions up for election are described below. SFUSD-logo-horizontal

Members of the Board serve up to two two-year terms in any one position, and newly elected Board Members will serve during 2016-17, beginning in January 2016. To be eligible, you must have or obtain a Slow Food membership. 

Education Committee Chair The Education Committee provides the San Diego community with education and enrichment opportunities and supports campus and school chapters. The Committee supports existing programs, including the School Garden program, Edible for San Diego Kids, Farm-to-School, as well as educational programming for families and adults. The Chair oversees the Education Committee, which meets monthly, striving to engage and include Slow Food Urban San Diego’s membership as much as possible.

Farm Liaison / Ark of Taste Liaison The Farm Liaison works to link Slow Food Urban San Diego with the local farming community and recommends strategies for the Chapter to advocate for and support farmers. The Farm Liaison sits on the Slow Food California Ark of Taste Committee (~2 conference calls a month and review of applications to the Ark) and to support Ark of Taste Programming and recognition in San Diego. The Farm Liaison may form a committee.

Membership Coordinator The Membership Coordinator oversees all things membership. S/he maintains and updates the Chapter’s membership list and leads in recruiting and retaining members; reports membership status at each board meeting; organizes membership drives and leads in planning Slow Food Urban San Diego’s “Slow Sips” events. The Membership Coordinator also maintains relationships with our Member Benefit Partners and continues to build the Member Benefit Program. The Membership Coordinator may develop and coordinate additional programs to build the Chapter membership and may form a committee.

Outreach / Food Justice Committee Chair The Outreach / Food Justice Committee spreads the word about Slow Food and collaborates with relevant community partners to promote sustainable food production and urban farming. The Committee represents SFUSD at community events and coordinates with the Membership Chair to develop and coordinate programs to build Chapter membership. The Committee also liaises with the Slow Food University Chapters, the SD Food Systems Alliance, and the Slow Food California Policy Committee, which meets monthly via conference call. The Chair oversees this committee and identifies community events and partnerships that best support the SFUSD mission and programs.

The Fund Development Chair The Fund Development Chair creates, maintains and updates an inventory of resources of potential donors and sponsors; develops and implements a fund-raising campaign to be supported by the Board. The Fund Development Chair may form a committee.

Secretary The Secretary records minutes during monthly Board Meetings, administers annual elections and coordinates a schedule of interviews for Board positions.

Treasurer The Treasurer maintains the books for the organization, handles expense reimbursements, accounts payable, and annual filings. The treasurer is responsible for leading the budgeting process and providing financial guidance to the Board, as well as presenting a Treasurer’s report at monthly board meetings. A working knowledge of Quickbooks is desired but training by the outgoing treasurer will be provided if necessary.

Vice Chair/Chair-elect The Vice Chair works with the current Board Chair to administrate the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board of Directors and maintain chapter standing. Candidates must have served on the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board for a minimum of one year and agree to assume the Board Chair position in 2017 for at least a one-year term.

Communications Committee Chair The Communications Committee facilitates Chapter communications through website maintenance, newsletters, social media and networking and ensures consistency of communications to members, media and the community. The Committee oversees marketing and getting the word out regarding Chapter activities. The Communications Chair oversees the committee and supports the Chapter Co-Leaders in tracking Slow Food California, Slow Food USA and Slow Food International activities of interest and in sharing SFUSD activities with other Slow Food entities. Strong writing, editing and communications skills required.

Sincerely, Slow Food Urban San Diego Board of Directors

 

2015 Good Food Community Fair

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SLOW FOOD URBAN SAN DIEGO'S THIRD ANNUAL

GOOD FOOD COMMUNITY FAIR

WATER WISE SAN DIEGO

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2015

11AM - 3PM

@ QUARTYARD IN DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO.

Go to GoodFoodFair.com for more information!

A celebration of artisanal food and craft drinks, cooking demos, art and music, discussion panels with local farmers, chefs, food producers and breweries, and more!

Join us downtown at the Quartyard to mix and mingle with San Diegans working towards a sustainable & delicious San Diego. Special programming and events will cover good, clean and fair food in a time of drought. Entrance is free.

It'll be a delicious time! Go to GoodFoodFair.com for more information!

Interested in Participating?  Would your organization like to host a complimentary booth at the fair? Please fill out this form by September 4th.

Questions? Please contact us at membership@slowfoodurbansandiego.org.

SFUSD Welcomes a New Member Benefit Partner, Local Habit

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Local Habit large logoSlow Food Urban San Diego welcomes our newest Member Benefit Partner, Local Habit! With "Cali-Creole" food, created by executive chef Nick Brune, Neopolitana-style pizzas, house-cured meats, local produce, and a seasonal menu, the newly re-opened Local Habit embodies Slow Food's mission. SFUSD members get 20% off drinks. Check out their farm-driven sustainable menu in Hillcrest.

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Psst: And keep your eye peeled for a SFUSD Slow Sips event at Local Habit in July!

Interested in becoming a Slow Food Member Benefit Partner? Email:membership@slowfoodurbansandiego.org.

Roosevelt Middle School Garden Volunteers Build Big!

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DSC_0313 From constructing raised beds for planting sweet potatoes to weeding garden boxes in preparation for the summer harvest, it was a productive day in the garden for the more than 50 volunteers who joined Slow Food Urban San Diego at Roosevelt Middle School on April 18.  Volunteers, including children, families, community leaders and a team from Navy Logistics, came together to help prepare the community and school gardens for planting.

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The Roosevelt school gardens are home to educational classes and community activities that allow students and local residents to development a deeper sense of self, their relationship with nature, our community, and our world.

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After a fun day in the sun (sunscreen provided!), volunteers shared stories and relaxed while munching on burritos donated by Chipotle and snacks provided by Specialty Produce.

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-contributed by Kathryn Rogers

Edible San Diego for Kids Issue #3

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Slow Food Urban San Diego is excited to announce the arrival of the Spring 2015 issue of Edible San Diego for Kids. This issue is all about seafood. It features articles written by San Diego kids and a delicious seafood recipe that kids can help make at home. There's also a gardening activity (hint: what squiggly crawlers help soil to stay healthy?). This issue is a bit more advanced that our first two, so we recommend it for 4th through 6th grade students.

Edible San Diego for Kids is produced by Slow Food Urban San Diego's Education Committee in collaboration with Edible San Diego. If you are interested in having copies delivered to your school, please email christina@slowfoodurbansandiego.org by April 20th.

You can see the issue online here.

This issue was made possible by the generosity of Chipotle!

Support Fishermen's Markets in San Diego and California - Support the Pacific-to-Plate Bill

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Slow Food Urban San Diego is excited about the new proposed legislation that will help California fishers get their products to Californians. State Assembly Speaker Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego) has introduced legislation, "Pacific to Plate," to clarify and streamline state laws to make it easier for San Diego's Tuna Harbor Dockside Market, and other fishermen's markets like it, to grow and thrive. See how you can support California's fishermen's markets and the Pacific-to-Plate bill below.

Slow Food Urban San Diego and Slow Food California Support this legislation. 

Three barriers in the current California laws and regulations affect fishermen's markets in California:

  1. Current laws and regulations in California do not define fishermen's markets so prevent them from easily obtaining permits to operation. 
  2. Current laws and regulations do not allow fishermen to clean fish for direct sale to consumers.
  3. Current laws allows direct fresh-caught fish sales to occur only from permanent, temporary, or mobile food facilities where permits are required for each participating fisherman or aquaculturist.

The proposed legislation:

  • Designates Fishermen's Markets as “food facilities” in the California Retail Food Code.
  • Exempts evisceration of whole raw fresh-caught fish at a Fishermen’s Market from the definition of food preparation to allow fresh-caught fish to be cleaned by the fishermen for direct sales to the public.
  • Establishes a separate Fishermen's Market chapter in state law, specifying the operational requirements (modeled after requirements for Certified Farmers' Markets) to allow commercial fishermen and aquaculturists to organize under a single permit holder for the market.
  • Clarifies that food facilities that sell certain products such as whole fresh-caught fish can have an open front.

If you'd like to support this legislation, please send a letter of support (like the sample letter below) to Speaker Atkins. Send letters to CA Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins. Some reasons to support Pacific to Plate AB 226:

  • Fishermen’s markets allow fishermen to sell local seafood direct to consumers - providing fresh seafood with a lower carbon footprint.
  • The Pacific-to-Plate legislation streamlines the permitting process, so that fishermen can sell direct to the public.
  • Fishermen's markets provide a place for fishermen to collaborate and plan what they'll fish - leading to more sustainable fishing practices, like fishing lightly across a wider variety of fish.
  • More fishermen's markets means more fresh fish available at better prices to the consumer.
  • Fishermen's markets, like farmers markets, connect the community to their food producers and the food producers to their community.
Send your letters to Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins by March 10, 2015:

Terroir and Terra Madre

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by Sarah Shoffler, SFUSD Board Member

In October 2014, slow foodies from the world over gathered at Slow Food International's biennial events in Turin, Italy, Salone del Gusto, the world’s largest food and wine exposition, and Terra Madre, a world meeting of food communities. Attendees affectionately call them the Olympics of Food. The concurrent events are dedicated to the celebration and sharing of artisanal, sustainable food and the small-scale producers that safeguard local traditions and high quality products. Good, Clean and Fair food from around the world.

Several San Diegan slow foodies attended as U.S. delegates. Aundrea Dominguez, a San Diego farmer and Slow Food Urban San Diego Ark of Taste Chair, attended in 2014 for the first time and shared her thoughts on the experience with us.

Why did you want to go?

Prior to this last year when I became more actively involved in Slow Food, I had not heard of Terra Madre, though once I knew about it, I had no doubt I would go. Besides the obvious reasons (great food and sights) my main reason for going this year was the theme, Ark of Taste. As a culinary gardener/farmer, preserving biodiversity is a hugely important part of what I do, which is also why I was drawn to that particular seat on the SFUSD board. I also wanted to use the opportunity to save and swap seeds, which I did.

Did you focus on any particular aspect of TM? If so, what?

Ark of Taste. Between the three days, I spent probably about 6-8 hours throughout the display, reading about the foods and where they were from, and speaking with the folks who farm/prepare, and eat them. It was so eye opening for me. It's one thing to read a list of food and an entirely different experience to walk through the physical catalog and have a tactile and sensory relationship with it.

What is one thing you learned?

I learned many small and specific things about terroir. Language was less of a barrier than you would expect when food is the topic at hand. Several farmers and I spoke about soil and why their tomatoes have such specific flavors that cannot be duplicated. One farmer, whose family has owned their land for eight generations, farms on soil with volcanic rock that has been breaking down slowly over about the last 100 years. Minerality like that cannot be replicated by amending soil, the flavors it imparts are inherent. I find that incredible. Having eaten mostly American-grown produce, or that which has been imported from South America, it was such a jolt to eat something I was familiar with but from a place on the other side of the world. It's so different that there is almost no comparing the two.

What was your most memorable experience?

I was fortunate to have snagged a front row seat at the panel with Carlo Petrini, Alice Waters and Jamie Oliver and it was a really encouraging experience to share space in a room of like-minded folks who respect good, clean, and fair food. It was a major highlight. But I also had an unbelievable time at this New Orleans pop-up dinner. I helped cook red beans and rice, and gumbo z'herbes, neither of which I'd ever made before. I was cooking with people from New Orleans, Baja, Chicago, etc. A week before, I hadn't known any of these folks but, we were all there cooking, learning, and embodying the values we were there to support.

Would you go back? Why?

In a heartbeat, and I plan to continue attending. It was the highlight of my year, and it was so reassuring. Farming is notoriously difficult and often thankless, but Terra Madre plugged me into a community that reveres artisans and farmers for answering their calling. Most of the farmers I spoke with got into it because it was a family business but, they also love it because they are productive and intimately connected to something exceptional, and I want to be part of that.

What would you recommend to anyone that goes in 2016?

I'll be very practical about this answer...I would recommend that they do their research on vendors and do the Salone del Gusto on the very first day, and the very last day. Also, wear good walking shoes, and have a backpack for goodies, not a shoulder bag. A first-timer should be prepared to spend the entire first day just visiting vendors, tasting, making notes, deciding what they want to buy and buying only the things they cannot live without first. Backpacks get heavy fast. The last day is great because you can score major deals on yummy goods.

I would also suggest having business cards with your basic contact info, because you'll be making lots of friends.

Get an AirBnb close by, and portable Wifi if you can.

Bring your A-game and sleep on the flight home.

Above all else, I would recommend being open to whatever presents itself at Salone and Terra Madre. There were many unexpected surprises for me, and not a single time was I disappointed.

GET INVOLVED! 2015 Board of Directors Elections

Apply by November 7th to info@slowfoodurbansandiego.org

 

Slow Food Urban San Diego is seeking qualified and passionate volunteers for our 2015/2016 term. Terms, unless otherwise noted, are two years with the option to re-apply for a second term. The following positions are up for re-elections:

 

Co-Chair, Adult Education

The Education Committee Co-Chair for Adult Education works with Education Co-Chair for Youth/Family to hold monthly Education Committee meetings, striving to engage and include Slow Food Urban San Diego's Membership as much as possible.  The Adult Education Committee Chair is expected to organize two classes annually geared towards adult taste and cooking education.

Chair, Food Justice

The Food Justice Chair holds monthly committee meetings and organizes Slow Bucks, a program which provides free local produce to low-income seniors.  The Food Justice Chair is also the liaison to the Slow Food California Policy Committee, which meets monthly via conference call.

Good Food Community Fair Chair

The Good Food Community Fair Chair is responsible for producing our annual event, The Good Food Community Fair, in conjunction with Food Day in October.  This position also leads other events as determined by the Board.

Secretary

The secretary takes minutes during board meetings and administers annual elections.

Communications

The Communications Chair holds monthly committee meetings and oversees the newsletter, blog, website and social media.

Treasurer

The Treasurer maintains the books for the organization, handles expense reimbursements, accounts payable, and annual filings.  The treasurer is responsible for leading the budgeting process and providing financial guidance to the Board.   This position presents a Treasurer's report at monthly board meetings.  A working knowledge of Quickbooks is required but training by the outgoing treasurer will be provided if necessary.

Co-Chair, Membership

The Membership Co-Chair maintains and updates the membership list and reports membership status at each board meeting.  Membership co-chairs share the responsibility of organizing membership drives in accordance to Slow Food USA directives and take the lead in planning Slow Food Urban San Diego's Annual Membership meeting. Membership Co-Chairs may develop and coordinate additional programs to build the Chapter membership.

Volunteer Coordinator

The Volunteer Coordinator handles the volunteer database, organizes volunteers for Slow Food and partner events and organizes one volunteer appreciation event annually.

Chair-elect/Vice Chair

The Chair-elect works with the Co-Chair to administrate the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board of Directors and maintain chapter standing.  Candidates must have served on the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board for a minimum of one year and agree to assume the Board Chair position in 2016 for a one-year term.

Chair

The Chair administrates the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board of Directors and maintains chapter standing.  Candidates must have served on the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board for a minimum of one year.  This is a one year term.

If you are interested in applying to the the Slow Food Urban San Diego Board of Directors, please email a brief bio and letter of interest indicating the position in which you are interested to info@slowfoodurbansandiego.org by November 7th.  In-person interviews will be scheduled the second and third weekends in November.

Sincerely,

Slow Food Urban San Diego Board of Directors

Slow Food and Chipotle lauch new partnership supporting local school gardens

Slow Food USA today announced a new partnership with Chipotle Mexican Grill to create or support approximately 100 schools gardens in 10 metropolitan areas across the country. Through hands-on discovery and an innovative school curriculum, the organizations hope to cultivate a new generation of kids who care more about where food comes from and how it is prepared.

"This partnership will dramatically increase the impact that our National School Garden Program will have by extending our reach deeper into communities and offering greater access to gardens and food education to children across the country," said Richard McCarthy, executive director of Slow Food USA.  "Chipotle is a company that is working to change fast food from the inside out, and we're thrilled to be working with them to take our Garden Program to the next level."

In the partnership’s first 15 months, Slow Food USA and Chipotle will work together to build or support school gardens in 10 metropolitan areas across the country, including Austin, Boston, Dallas, Denver, New York (Long Island and northern New Jersey), Louisville, Orange County, Phoenix, Miami and San Diego.

Slow Food Urban San Diego will provide a host of services to support the local school garden program, including customized curriculum, funding, labor, and other resources to match the needs of the individual schools and/or districts, with in-depth technical assistance from the Slow Food USA national staff. Chipotle will provide funding through micro grants, in-restaurant fundraisers and hands-on support.

“With this new partnership, we want to give children access to a hands-on learning experience at their schools, to teach them how food is grown, and the importance of cooking and healthy eating,” said Mark Crumpacker, chief marketing and development officer at Chipotle.

Both Slow Food USA and Chipotle share a belief in making better food widely available. Slow Food USA is committed to good, clean and fair food for all, and Chipotle is changing the way people think about and eat fast food by using ingredients that are raised with respect for the land, the animals and the farmers. Separately, each organization has made significant strides in their respective areas, and together, they will work to improve the food culture in schools across the U.S.A.

ABOUT SLOW FOOD USA

Slow Food USA is part of the global Slow Food network of over 100,000 members in more than 150 countries.  Slow Food is the only grassroots organization working locally, nationally and internationally to link the pleasures of the table with a commitment to community and the environment. With our National School Garden Program, we are teaching the next generation how to grow, prepare and share food responsibly. For more information, visit SlowFoodUSA.org.

ABOUT CHIPOTLE

Steve Ells, founder, chairman and co-CEO, started Chipotle with the idea that food served fast did not have to be a typical fast food experience. Today, Chipotle continues to offer a focused menu of burritos, tacos, burrito bowls (a burrito without the tortilla) and salads made from fresh, high-quality raw ingredients, prepared using classic cooking methods and served in a distinctive atmosphere. Through our vision of Food With Integrity, Chipotle is seeking better food from using ingredients that are not only fresh, but that—where possible—are sustainably grown and Responsibly Raised™ with respect for the animals, the land, and the farmers who produce the food. In order to achieve this vision, we focus on building a special people culture that is centered on creating teams of top performers empowered to achieve high standards. This people culture not only leads to a better dining experience for our customers, it also allows us to develop future leaders from within. Chipotle opened with a single restaurant in 1993 and currently operates more than 1,600 restaurants including six ShopHouse Southeast Asian Kitchen restaurants, and is an investor in an entity that owns and operates one Pizzeria Locale. For more information, visit Chipotle.com

Salone del Gusto, Terra Madre and the International Congress in Italy

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Salone del Gusto and Terra Madre, Slow Food’s biennial international food fair and sustainability conference concluded last week in Turin, Italy.  This year, the event was attended by Slow Food Urban San Diego’s Co-Leader, Candice Woo and the chapter’s Co-Founder, Donna McLoughlin, who were among the 200,000+ attendees - including Slow Food leaders, activists, educators and farmers - who participated in educational sessions focused on animal welfare, health, social issues and food waste and attended taste workshops featuring wine, craft beer, cheese and artisan food.  Among the speakers at the event’s opening ceremony were Alice Waters, Slow Food’s vice president, famed restaurateur and founder of the Edible Schoolyard and Nikki Henderson, Executive Director of the People’s Grocery in Oakland.

The week in Turin also hosted the International Congress, a global Slow Food gathering of 650 delegates from 95 different countries, including two delegates from Southern California.  The key event purpose was to help define the future of the organization and was led by Carlo Petrini, the founder of Slow Food and the non profit’s current president, who was re-elected for another term.  Petrini spoke about his next goals for Slow Food, or “Slow Food 2.0”, including increasing the number of food gardens being created by Slow Food chapters in Africa, expanding the work to protect biodiversity of food products around the world and growing Slow Food’s network, which is currently comprised of 1,500 international chapters.

Speakers from countries across the globe, including China, Israel, Brazil and Somalia, gave presentations on issues concerning their local food communities and U.S. delegate Michael Dimock, Slow Food Russian River founder and President of Roots of Change, proposed a motion and received the delegation’s support of the goal of Proposition 37, the Label GMO ballot initiative in California, which Slow Food Urban San Diego also supports.

 

- By Candice Woo

Cottage Industrialists Unite!

You know its happened to you. You see it two booths away. It is perfect and you must have it. You smile at the lady behind the table and hand her a couple bucks. Your fingers work at the cling wrap before you have even turned away into the hustle and bustle of the farmers' market. You take a bite of the most beautiful cookie you have ever seen (not counting your Aunt Dollie's cookies from back home). You let the chocolate melt in your mouth, the saltiness tingle your taste buds. Your friend asks you how it is and you answer, "Eh, its good, but man, my Aunt Dollie's cookies are so much more awesome!" By the time you reach the end of the row you have the image of a booth, of you in an apron selling Aunt Dollie's scrumptious baked goods. Then you remember you have to use an expensive commercial kitchen for that type of thing... Well, there is something to get very excited about cottage industrialists! Governor Jerry Brown just signed AB 1616 into law proclaiming that "non-potentially hazardous foods" such as breads, fruit pies, and jams can be prepared in home kitchens and sold to stores, restaurants, and directly to the public. Of course there is a bit of regulation involved including getting a food safety certification and registering with the local health department. But hey, that's a lot less cost and hassle than installing a certified commercial kitchen in your home or renting space outside the house. Talk about an opportunity for thousands of households to make some extra money and share their talent! How will this affect the farmers' market crowd? Will there be a flood of homemade baked goods and jams coming to the stands?

That is perhaps a question for Catt White and Christopher Smyczek of SD Weekly Markets in their popular Vendor 101 seminar. Aspiring vendors can learn about start up costs, permits, product development, marketing and a slew of other useful information from the two star market managers.The next one is happening October 29th.

So go ask Aunt Dollie for her killer cookie recipe, do some research on the new regulations, take the seminar, and get baking!

Welcome San Diego Public Market!

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San Diego Public Market opened its enormous warehouse doors on September 12th, 2012. The vision of Catt White and Dale Steele, supported by thousands of eager San Diegans through grassroots action and Kickstarter funding, the Public Market is ambitiously putting down roots just west of the I-5. The bright orange warehouse at 1735 National Avenue in Barrio Logan is now open two days a week for San Diego's newest farmers markets: Wednesday and Sunday 9am-2pm. I wandered through the prepared food stands with the pumpkin bread, garlic spreads, and steaming tamales tempting me at every stride. The farm stands were bustling around 11am. I chose beautiful heads of butter lettuce, deep green avocados, and sweet fresh dates (OK, and a gorgeous handmade cutting board) to place in my reusable bags for the trek home. Marketeers were excited and optimistic about the market's opening week, noting that the relatively chill atmosphere was perfect for adjusting to the new venue. And what a venue it is! The Miss Sushi food truck was parked inside (yes, inside!) the building next picnic tables for noshers. The voices of happy patrons floated up into the huge expanse above the steel girders and mixed with the tunes strummed by the live band. Industrial remnants of the building's former life still occupy the re-purposed space and provide plenty of happy distractions while strolling through the veggie packed lanes. And I have to admit that during this heatwave, it was really nice to take a leisurely look without the sun beating down on the chard (and me).

Check it out. Buy some goodies. Support our local food system!

www.sandiegopublicmarket.com

 

A Digital Conversation with Alysha Stehly and Chris Broomell

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Check out this month's Digital Conversation with Alysha Stehly and Chris Broomell of Vesper Vineyards and Triple B Ranches. Be sure not to miss their stop on the upcoming San Diego County Farm Bureau's Farm Tour Day.

And Don't forget to read our June Newsletter!

 

Dine On The Dock is Tonight!

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To get you excited for the evening's activities, we're revisiting our interview with Peter Halmay of the San Diego Fishermen's Working Group.

A Conversation with Peter Halmay from SFUSD on Vimeo.

There are still a few tickets left!  Buy yours here.  The proceeds from your ticket will assist in Peter's and The San Diego Fishermen's Working Group's efforts in establishing the waterfront fish market of our dreams!

In Case You Missed It… Fermentation!

by Erin Batty May 10th was standing room only at the Triangle building, and emails and calls continue to filter in requesting information about ginger-beer, raw milk cheese, water kefir, and the like.  I think this calls for another fermentation class!

Little did I know that fermenting is a passion shared by so many Urban San Diegans.  But to my pleasant surprise, the lacto-fermentation class sold out and a sizeable donation was generated for Seeds at City Urban Farm.  Thank you to all who attended for your interest, enthusiasm, and participation!

Lacto-fermented foods are uniquely nourishing to the body and open the door to a world of complex flavors.  Enhance your sandwich with Stogsdill’s kraut, suit your salad with fermented dressings, make a snack of pickled vegetables, or pair your potatoes with homemade ketchup.  There are endless possibilities for fermented foods, if only there were more hours in the day to try them all!

Pickled carrots are elementary.  Who is ready to step it up a notch at the next fermentation workshop?

In the meantime, enjoy this surprisingly simple recipe for delicious homemade ketchup…

Slow Food Urban San Diego Announces the Formation of the Sustainable Seafood Committee

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Sustainability and leadership are central to the core values of Slow Food Urban San Diego, and on April 26 we were honored by San Diego Oceans Foundation with an Ocean Leadership Award for Community Group of the Year – presented at the Oceans Benefit Gala celebrating sustainable seafood. April also saw the launch of the newest committee initiative of SFUSD – the Sustainable Seafood Committee. The committee will work to support local sustainable seafood initiatives in our community and link San Diegans with artisans of the sea, the local fishermen, to promote a direct market and working waterfront. The award recognizes an organization for making “a significant impact in enhancing the marine environment, protecting sensitive marine resources, and promoting community involvement by inspiring, motivating, and educating others.” We will take that as affirmation that we are headed in the right direction. The Sustainable Seafood Committee will provide another avenue to support sustainable food in a manner that honors the region’s rich maritime history while fulfilling our role as a trusted community resource.

The award and the committee are milestones of achievement and vision – how far we have come and where we hope to lead. Over the past year SFUSD has shown its growing commitment, as a sponsor of  the 3rd annual Maritime Gala Dinner & Awards Ceremony – A Sustainable Seafood Feast (put on by The Maritime Alliance – “promoting Blue Tech & Blue Jobs” that support sustainable oceans), as a trusted source in the selection of San Diego Coastkeeper as the 2011 recipient of the maritime community’s Sustainable Seafood Award.

The committee is chaired by Kristen Goodrich (Board Member, 2009-11).  Kristen is the Coastal Training Program Coordinator at the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve in Imperial Beach.  She has a masters degree in marine affairs and policy and experience in developing sustainable seafood guides and fisheries management.

Slow Food Receives the Ocean Leadership Award for Community Group of the Year

img_0147 Thursday, April 26th, Slow Food Urban San Diego was awarded the Ocean Leadership Award for Community Group of the year for Excellence in Ocean Stewardship 2012.  The award was presented at the San Diego Oceans Foundation Gala at Sea World.  In attendance at the event were chefs, fishermen and organizations ivolved in the sustainable seafood community.

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