Community Partners

2015 Good Food Community Fair

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SLOW FOOD URBAN SAN DIEGO'S THIRD ANNUAL

GOOD FOOD COMMUNITY FAIR

WATER WISE SAN DIEGO

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2015

11AM - 3PM

@ QUARTYARD IN DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO.

Go to GoodFoodFair.com for more information!

A celebration of artisanal food and craft drinks, cooking demos, art and music, discussion panels with local farmers, chefs, food producers and breweries, and more!

Join us downtown at the Quartyard to mix and mingle with San Diegans working towards a sustainable & delicious San Diego. Special programming and events will cover good, clean and fair food in a time of drought. Entrance is free.

It'll be a delicious time! Go to GoodFoodFair.com for more information!

Interested in Participating?  Would your organization like to host a complimentary booth at the fair? Please fill out this form by September 4th.

Questions? Please contact us at membership@slowfoodurbansandiego.org.

Educating and Advocating for Healthy Bees in San Diego: Profile of San Diego Beekeeping Society Secretary Camille Smith

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San Diego Beekeeping Society Honeybees intuitively know when it’s time to nurture a new queen. So it’s no surprise that when Camille Smith landed in San Diego, the bees took flight to bring her a hive to nurture in preparation for a role as Secretary and Volunteer, Recruitment and Event Planning Coordinator of the San Diego Beekeeping Society.

Smith has always been interested in bees, but it wasn’t until she moved to California in 2008 that she had the opportunity to keep a hive of her own. That summer, three swarms came through her backyard, enticing her to buy a bee box. The bees didn’t return, but a few months later a friend called saying they had caught a swarm. Her forays as a suburban beekeeper had begun.

Over the next few months, she read a numerous books about beekeeping, watched educational videos on YouTube and joined the San Diego Beekeeping Society. From her mentor and working with society members, she learned hands-on how to properly care for bees to help them thrive.

Her initial interest in working bees quickly transformed into heartfelt passion.

“I love working with the bees,” gushes Smith. “It is so amazing how they work completely collectively with no ego. Everything they do is for the benefit of the entire hive. Even at the end of their lives, they go outside the hive to die so their sisters don’t have to clean out their bodies.”

This level of collective thinking inspires Smith in her role bringing people together at the San Diego Beekeeping Society. She and more than 1,000 volunteer members work to educate people about bees and best practices in responsible beekeeping. They visit schools and participate in community events to increase awareness about pollination and bees among people of all ages.

“The more information people have about bees, the more people are aware to not use pesticides/herbicides in their yards,” explains Smith.

The San Diego Beekeeping Society also works to advocate for legislation that is friendlier to bees and beekeeping. They had success a few years ago working with a coalition to loosen restrictions on urban beekeeping and designate best practices for keeping bees in the City of San Diego. More recently, the San Diego Beekeeping Society has worked with the County of San Diego to update their policies to make it easier for beekeepers to comply with the ordinances.

“We’ve made good progress,” says Smith. “We are proud to be doing our little part to help support the bees, and we have more people every month interested in becoming beekeepers.”

Even with growing efforts to support them, bees are not out of danger. Colonies are still collapsing from the combined effects of exposure to pesticides and herbicides, monoculture that limits access to food sources when crops are not blooming, and weakened immune systems from parasitic mites.

What can you do to learn more and support healthy bees?

Like the community-minded bees, together we can do more. Take it from a resident Queen Bee:

“Bees pollinate one third of the crops we eat,” explains Smith. “There is a direct relationship between the bees, our food, and our health. By voting with our pocket books – choosing to support local and sustainable food production through farmers’ markets and CSA – the food vendors will have to adjust. And the bees will fare better too.”

Making Mead and Better Food Systems for Us All - An Interview with Golden Coast Mead CEO, Frank Golbeck

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View More: http://taylorabeel.pass.us/goldencoast A few years ago, Frank Golbeck came home from his eighth 16-hour workday in a row and collapsed from exhaustion on his living room floor. His wife, Theresa, came up to him and said; “Frank, you’re not happy. Look at you, just lying on the floor there miserable after work. If you had all the time, money and energy in the world, what would you do?”

Golbeck had never stopped to ask himself if he enjoyed what he was doing with his life. Prompted by his wife’s question, his mind drifted back to his early years growing up in Orange County. He often visited his grandfather’s apple farm in San Bernardino and has fond memories of watching him share his honey wine (mead), hard cider and fruit wine with customers.

During his college years studying economic development at UC Berkeley, Golbeck and some friends worked at the student organic garden and made mead to share with their friends. Those were some of his favorite moments – breaking open a bottle of home-brewed mead to kick off a dance-until-the-sunrise kind of night.

Inspired by his wife’s encouragement and the joy of recollecting such happy times in his life, Golbeck called up his college friend and fellow mead maker, Joe Colangelo (now Golden Coast Mead Director of Sales and Marketing). They brainstormed about how to turn their love of mead into a viable business plan. Quickly recognizing a need for someone to manage their finances, they reached out to Praveen Ramineni (now Golden Coast Mead CFO), and working together, developed the concept for Golden Coast Mead (of which Golbeck is now CEO).

In 2010, after sending inquiries to more than 50 local breweries and wineries, the Broomell family (of Triple B Ranches and Vesper Vineyards) was the only respondent willing to share their capacity and expertise. With Triple B’s support, the Golden Coast Mead team sold their first batch of mead in 2011.

Today, almost five years later, Golden Coast Mead is fermenting mead in their own fully licensed facility with 4,370 gallons of fermentation capacity, and they distribute their ferments to nearly 100 accounts throughout San Diego County. They also serve select locations in Orange County, Los Angeles, New York and New Jersey.

Golden Coast

So what makes Golden Coast Mead special?

Golbeck calls their process and product “magic.”

“We are capturing sunshine and turning it into something you can pour for your friends and drink together,” gushes Golbeck. “Modern mead-making is a journey of discovery and craftsmanship.  Using a combination of innovation, science and educated guesswork, we unlock layers and styles of mead that no one has ever tasted.  There is a whole spectrum of mead for us to create that runs wider and deeper than that of beer and wine, and we are proud to do it in a natural, refreshing, and balanced way with no sulfites, filtration, or forced carbonation.”

Golden Coast Mead’s signature San Diego-style mead is a result of this commitment to innovation.

“By adjusting ingredient ratios, we are able to change the body and flavor profile to make it really well suited to our San Diego climate,” says Golbeck. “By using ale yeast and less honey, we are making meads that are crisp and light instead of thick and syrupy.”

View More: http://taylorabeel.pass.us/goldencoast

An all natural product? Check. Unique flavor profiles? Check. But what about the impact Golden Coast Mead is having on the bigger ecological system in the San Diego region and beyond?

“The bees enable and inspire this whole thing,” says Golbeck. “With colony collapse disorder, we have an opportunity to right an imbalance caused by monoculture, which is harmful to bees’ fragile immune systems. We are trying to promote organic agriculture business models by helping to build the market for local, organic honey on a large scale.”

So what’s the takeaway?

Golbeck hopes Golden Coast Mead will inspire people to do what they love and share it. In turn, perhaps this will create more sustainable food systems for us all.

You can taste Golden Coast Mead’s latest brews at their tasting rooms in Oceanside and Julian, look for them at a local beer and wine store near you, or try their mead at Slow Food Urban San Diego’s “Sweet Sips” Networking Event and Screening of “More than Honey” on July 23.

View More: http://taylorabeel.pass.us/goldencoast

Photo credits @Taylor Abeel of www.sojournimagery.com

Local Habit’s Chef Jimmy Tessier Sweetens Up This Month’s Honey-Themed Slow Sips

Local Habit Our host for this month’s Slow Sips networking event featuring honeybee experts plus mead and honey tastings from San Diego-based producers is Local Habit: a vibrant Cali-Creole restaurant in San Diego’s lively urban community of Hillcrest. Local Habit specializes in local ingredients, craft beer and New Orleans-inspired cocktails. Local Habit recently welcomed a new executive chef, Emeril protégée Jimmy Tessier, who brings 25 years of experience to each plate he serves. Chef Jimmy is excited to use his fusion style of blending unique flavors to bring new and imaginative dishes to Local Habit.

Local Habit Chef Jimmy Tessier

Native to Fall River, Massachusetts and a 1995 graduate of Johnson & Wales University, Tessier has a long history of working across the country with some of the top chefs in the industry. In 1994, Tessier was taken under the wing of famed celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse. He worked with Emeril in Las Vegas to open two of his hotspot restaurants, Emeril’s New Orleans Fish House and Delmonico Steakhouse. During his 18 years in Las Vegas, Tessier honed his skills in a variety of different cuisines including French, Mediterranean and Italian.

Having worked with numerous high profile chefs including Chef Carla Pellegrino of Top Chef fame and Chef Sammy DeMarco of Travel Channel’s “Chow Masters,” Tessier brings an accumulation of learned talent from the best mentors in the business. This talent paired with his gritty and ambitious energy earned him a spot on Food Network’s hit show Chopped in 2012.

Tessier decided to make San Diego his home in 2014 when he helped open Union Kitchen and Tap as Executive Sous Chef. Now with feet planted at Local Habit, Tessier is excited to showcase his wealth of knowledge of different cuisines.

“I want guests to know that Local Habit isn’t just about gumbo,” said Tessier. “Because I was trained by such a variety of chefs, I am not pigeonholed into one type of food. I love putting spins on classic New Orleans-style plates.”

Tessier is excited to host this month’s honey-themed Slow Sips event at Local Habit, especially because of his love of using honey as an ingredient.

“Honey is amazing to cook with because it’s in its purest form and you can create the guiltiest pleasures,” said Tessier.

Tessier will be serving Honey Mustard Lamb Chops with Truffled Cauliflower Puree along with Smoked Honey Bread Pudding with Candied Walnuts and Ginger Honey Ice Cream for the honey-themed Slow Sips event.

Want to use honey in your cooking at home? Here’s the recipe for Chef Tessier’s Honey Mustard Lamb Chops:

Local Habit Honey Mustard Lamb Chops Recipe

Become a Member Benefit Partner!

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Our members are always on the lookout for Slow Food-friendly restaurants and businesses. These are establishments that provide delicious food created with locally-sourced ingredients and good, clean, and fair practices. We strive to recommend businesses our members should support to satisfy their Slow Food cravings. Our goal is to encourage members to stimulate the local economy and support local restaurants and the long food chain that supports them from farmer to chef. We hope that, by providing our members with special discounts at select Slow Food-friendly restaurants, they will be encouraged to experience and support the culinary gems of urban San Diego.

How It Works

All Slow Food Urban San Diego members receive a Member Benefits Card that they can present to receive a small (10% suggested) discount on their food bill (including or excluding alcohol) or a special offer at Slow Food-friendly businesses. With your participation, we hope to encourage our engaged and passionate community of members to shop and support Slow Food-minded businesses such as yours.

Join SFUSD

Participating restaurants and businesses will be highlighted on the Slow Food Urban San Diego website, newsletter and Facebook page. To view current program participants please visit our Member Benefits webpage.

We at Slow Food Urban San Diego are very excited about the support that our Membership Benefit program will provide to the local San Diego food economy. If you think that you might be interested in becoming a part of this program, please complete the attached application. We’d be happy to answer any questions you might have - thank you for your consideration!

If you would like your business to participate in our Member Benefits program, please complete and the application below send your it to us at the following address:

Email: membership@slowfoodurbansandiego.org

OR

Post:    SFUSD Membership 301 Washington St. Box 216 San Diego CA 92103

Membership Benefits Program Application

If you have any questions about the Member Benefit Program or partnering with SFUSD, please contact us at: membership@slowfoodurbansandiego.org.

 

 

SFUSD Welcomes a New Member Benefit Partner, Local Habit

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Local Habit large logoSlow Food Urban San Diego welcomes our newest Member Benefit Partner, Local Habit! With "Cali-Creole" food, created by executive chef Nick Brune, Neopolitana-style pizzas, house-cured meats, local produce, and a seasonal menu, the newly re-opened Local Habit embodies Slow Food's mission. SFUSD members get 20% off drinks. Check out their farm-driven sustainable menu in Hillcrest.

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Psst: And keep your eye peeled for a SFUSD Slow Sips event at Local Habit in July!

Interested in becoming a Slow Food Member Benefit Partner? Email:membership@slowfoodurbansandiego.org.

Roosevelt Middle School Garden Volunteers Build Big!

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DSC_0313 From constructing raised beds for planting sweet potatoes to weeding garden boxes in preparation for the summer harvest, it was a productive day in the garden for the more than 50 volunteers who joined Slow Food Urban San Diego at Roosevelt Middle School on April 18.  Volunteers, including children, families, community leaders and a team from Navy Logistics, came together to help prepare the community and school gardens for planting.

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The Roosevelt school gardens are home to educational classes and community activities that allow students and local residents to development a deeper sense of self, their relationship with nature, our community, and our world.

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After a fun day in the sun (sunscreen provided!), volunteers shared stories and relaxed while munching on burritos donated by Chipotle and snacks provided by Specialty Produce.

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-contributed by Kathryn Rogers

Edible San Diego for Kids Issue #3

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Slow Food Urban San Diego is excited to announce the arrival of the Spring 2015 issue of Edible San Diego for Kids. This issue is all about seafood. It features articles written by San Diego kids and a delicious seafood recipe that kids can help make at home. There's also a gardening activity (hint: what squiggly crawlers help soil to stay healthy?). This issue is a bit more advanced that our first two, so we recommend it for 4th through 6th grade students.

Edible San Diego for Kids is produced by Slow Food Urban San Diego's Education Committee in collaboration with Edible San Diego. If you are interested in having copies delivered to your school, please email christina@slowfoodurbansandiego.org by April 20th.

You can see the issue online here.

This issue was made possible by the generosity of Chipotle!

UrbanLife Farms Volunteer Day - A great success!

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A huge thank you to Slow Food Urban San Diego volunteers who came out in March to help UrbanLife students garden at their farm. Volunteers planted 12 fruit trees and put in 2,500 linear feet of beds for veggies! Do you want to help bring Good, Clean & Fair food to San Diego youth and schools? Contact volunteer@slowfoodurbansandiego.org.

Slow Food Urban San Diego is partnering with UrbanLife and we need volunteers to help with gardening. UrbanLife transforms vacant plots of land into self-sustaining urban farms, providing jobs and job skills training to urban youth, cultivating health and wellness education, and growing fresh healthy produce for our youth and local communities.

UrbanLife just broke ground on their second location in southeast San Diego. This one-acre farm will employ youth in the area, teach them job skills, and bring healthy produce back into the neighborhood. The students grow all the food themselves, maintain the land and put together CSA boxes. Their wages come out of CSA boxes sold.

Slow Food Urban San Diego volunteers worked alongside the students on Saturday, March 14th.

Community Nights at Napizza!

We are so very honored to have been selected to be a beneficiary of Little Italy's Napizza Community nights! Every Tuesday in November from 3pm-9pm 10% of each check will be donated to support Slow Food Urban San Diego. Sourcing ingredients from local and organic farms to make their handcraft pizzas and salads Napizza uses Slow Food principals when crafting their delicious dishes. Procedes from Community Nights at Napizza will go right back to support school garden programs, educational efforts and other good food work in the San Diego Urban community! We hope to see you there for this delicious fundraiser!

March Slow Sips!

Join us for Slow Sips on March 19th, 6-8pm, at Fish Public! This month we have a extra special treat for you! We'll be celebrating Sustainable Seafood Month as part of our monthly Slow Sips event!

As always, you'll be able to learn more about getting involved in our grass-roots organization, sign up to be a volunteer, and meet and mingle with like-minded friends. There will be a cash bar and full menu available for ordering. In addition, thanks to a Collaborative Fisheries Research West grant awarded to researchers at California Sea Grant based at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and at University of San Diego we are also able to feature  complimentary samples of local seafood prepared by the Fish Public kitchen!

This is a Slow Sips event you won't want to miss!

Please let us know that you're coming: RSVP here!

 

About Fish Public: Restaurant visionary Tracy Borkum manifests a quaint 3,500-square-foot seafood eatery in San Diego’s charming Kensington neighborhood with Fish Public, which opened doors in June 2013. Fish offers quality sea fare at accessible price points and draws culinary inspiration from the Atlantic’s Gulf Coast, New England and English Coast as well as West Coast of America, Baja and Pacific Rim regions. Unique offerings include an artisan retail area and a custom chef’s oyster counter with peek-a-boo views into the kitchen. The interior design, spearheaded by Borkum herself, is reminiscent of a Nantucket-inspired beach cottage with a light and airy appeal.

Focal details include whitewashed wood accents and unexpected lighting fixtures fashioned from old fishing nets. Fish Public’s beverage program is comprised of draft craft beers, an international wine selection and an eclectic cocktail menu with all mixers, syrups and infusions made in-house.

Fish Public is located at 4055 Adams Avenue and is open Sunday from 5-9pm, Tuesday through Thursday from 5-9pm, and Friday through Saturday from 5-10pm. Happy Hour is Tuesday-Sunday from 5-6:30pm. For more information please visit www.fishpublic.com or check or call 619.281.4014. For updates visit Fish Public on Facebook at www.facebook.comm/fish.public or Twitter at @fishpublic.

Head, Heart, Hands & Health

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To many city-dwellers, the mention of 4-H conjures images of the county fair: kids chasing greased pigs, chicken cages with red ribbons, white and black cows towering over smiling youngsters. While this perception of the century old organization is partly true, the history and current mission of 4-H (Head, Heart, Hands & Health) is much more expansive. 4-H clubs started in Ohio in the late 19th century as the USDA's Cooperative Extension System were beginning to disseminate new farming technology through land grant universities and regional offices. As it often happens, older farmers were less keen on experimenting with new "advances" in their field (literally). So clubs were formed to attract the younger farmers-to-be to learn about leaderships skills, local economies, and, of course, agricultural innovations.

Nowadays the scope has widened to encompass a number of community activities to help students to learn leadership, citizenship and life skills. Here in San Diego a 4-H club member could be participating in activities from veterinary sciences to marine biology to animal husbandry to ham radio. (Here's a full list of 4-H activities in San Diego).

Not to say that the agricultural side of 4-H has been abandoned: Slow Food Urban San Diego had the pleasure of working with Henry Kraus, a local 4-H student committed to raising his pigs organically. He is learning about leadership, economics, and agriculture in his community in a big way: bucking the "conventional" model amongst the pressure of adults and peers to raise his pig non-organically must not have been easy! But he stuck to his guns and raised a beautiful healthy pig that fetched a price tag well above the conventionally raised pigs in his midst. As everyone who attended last months Pig Picking at Roots Community Kitchen, the outcome was delicious! Henry, leading by example, is in turn helping to educate other local farmers (or farmers-in-training) about the benefits of raising livestock organically. The four leaves of the 4-H clover (head, heart, hands, and health) are certainly being grown and nourished by such an effort.

Through the support of local 4-H programs here in San Diego we can assist our youth in fulfilling the 4-H pledge and subsequently set the stage for a healthier, kinder, and more educated foodie/farmer community:

I pledge my head to clearer thinking, My heart to greater loyalty, My hands to larger service, and my health to better living, for my club, my community, my country, and my world.

For more information about 4-H, check out their website.

 

Mama's Kitchen Pies!

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It's not too late to help a great organization and enjoy some tasty Thanksgiving pies. Here's the lowdown from Mama's Kitchen's Pies website: Mama’s Kitchen’s Pie in the Sky Bake Sale Sells Thanksgiving Pies from October 1st through November 21st

Each November since 2005, dozens of San Diego restaurants, bakeries, and caterers donate thousands of pies that volunteers then sell to family, friends and colleagues. Delicious apple, pumpkin, pecan and no-sugar-added apple pies cost $20 each ($15 is tax deductible), providing over six hearty home-delivered meals to a Mama’s Kitchen client and a tasty Thanksgiving dessert to the buyer.

Mama’s Kitchen is the only organization that prepares and delivers free nutritious home-cooked meals for every day of the year throughout San Diego County to men, women and children affected by AIDS or cancer.

For more information and to order pies, go to Mamaspies.org.

Pig Pickin’ in Support of Organics in Local 4H Programming

Here are some photos from today's tasty pig pickin' at Roots Community Kitchen in Santee. Thanks Henry for raising such a delicious pig as well as raising awareness among your fellow 4H members about organic animal husbandry! And a round of applause for all the chefs and local beverage purveyors for cooking up and complementing all those pork dishes!

Wild Willow 5K and Chili Brew Fest

Runners, beer drinkers, local food advocates and families traversed their way down to the southern most region of San Diego last weekend to participate in the first annual Wild Willow Farm 5k Race and Chili Brew Fest. With the harvest season well upon us, the event was a celebration of sorts, featuring a chili cook-off and homebrew competition, plus a 5K trail run/walk. Live music from the Big Decisions, self-guided farm tours and a variety of homebrews and chili concoctions made for an incredible day of fun, community building, and success. wildwillow-12-large

Volunteers ushered runners across the finish line into the “beer garden” to enjoy fresh brews from local sponsors like Stone, Alesmith, and Coronado Brewing Company. The line up of judges for the homebrew competition included major San Diego brewers like Greg Koch from Stone Brewing, Peter Zien from Alesmith Brewing, and Laurie Delk from 100 Beers in 30 Days. At least 38 different brews were accounted for, but only one took grand prize- a robust, malty, Imperial Red Ale bursting with flavorful, bright hops. The donated beer was another welcome accompaniment to the 8 different chilies entered into the contest. The overall winner, named “Beegee’s Southwest Chili” won by just 1 point over other entries. Judges for the chili cook-off included Chef Nick Brune from Local Habit, Wild Willow board member Angie Vorhies, and local food and beer advocate Marty Frank.

Nearly 300 people attended the event, out of which 200 participated in the actual race. Tickets were sold for admission to the race and individual beer and chili tastings, and over $2,000 was raised to benefit operations and educational programs at Wild Willow Farm. They intend to purchase or retrofit a truck in order to deliver produce to their CSA customers and to the select restaurants that support the farm. With such a wide variety of programs offered onsite and in the local community, Wild Willow Farm is quickly becoming a central facility for the education of a new generation of farmers and the conservation of organic and sustainable food systems in San Diego.

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Celebrate the Craft Turns Ten on Sunday!

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We sat down with Chef Jeff Jackson of The Lodge at Torrey Pines to discuss the motivation and inspiration for this San Diego Tradition.

Celebrate the Craft from SFUSD on Vimeo.

Tickets are still available for the September 30th event. Purchase them here.

Thanks, Chef!

Cottage Industrialists Unite!

You know its happened to you. You see it two booths away. It is perfect and you must have it. You smile at the lady behind the table and hand her a couple bucks. Your fingers work at the cling wrap before you have even turned away into the hustle and bustle of the farmers' market. You take a bite of the most beautiful cookie you have ever seen (not counting your Aunt Dollie's cookies from back home). You let the chocolate melt in your mouth, the saltiness tingle your taste buds. Your friend asks you how it is and you answer, "Eh, its good, but man, my Aunt Dollie's cookies are so much more awesome!" By the time you reach the end of the row you have the image of a booth, of you in an apron selling Aunt Dollie's scrumptious baked goods. Then you remember you have to use an expensive commercial kitchen for that type of thing... Well, there is something to get very excited about cottage industrialists! Governor Jerry Brown just signed AB 1616 into law proclaiming that "non-potentially hazardous foods" such as breads, fruit pies, and jams can be prepared in home kitchens and sold to stores, restaurants, and directly to the public. Of course there is a bit of regulation involved including getting a food safety certification and registering with the local health department. But hey, that's a lot less cost and hassle than installing a certified commercial kitchen in your home or renting space outside the house. Talk about an opportunity for thousands of households to make some extra money and share their talent! How will this affect the farmers' market crowd? Will there be a flood of homemade baked goods and jams coming to the stands?

That is perhaps a question for Catt White and Christopher Smyczek of SD Weekly Markets in their popular Vendor 101 seminar. Aspiring vendors can learn about start up costs, permits, product development, marketing and a slew of other useful information from the two star market managers.The next one is happening October 29th.

So go ask Aunt Dollie for her killer cookie recipe, do some research on the new regulations, take the seminar, and get baking!

Suzie's Farm Second Annual Autumnal Equinox Dinner is tomorrow!

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Those of you lucky enough to have a ticket to The Second Annual Suzie's Farm Autumnal Equinox Dinner are in for a real treat tomorrow! Chefs Joe Magnanelli, Max Bonacci and Javier Plascencia along with the crew at Suzie's Farm are working hard to bring you the dining experience of the year! Guests will enjoy appetizers in the two-acre sunflower maze and a three course meal with beverage pairings at Sun Grown. Watch the video below to see what the chefs have to say about Slow Food in our city.

AED Chef video from SFUSD on Vimeo.

This event is sold out so be sure to keep an eye out for next year!

Eat Drink Local Week is here!

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Tables overflowing with delicious food, raffle baskets full of veggies and natural products, a jazz band plucking, strumming, and drumming away as the sun set over Point Loma... Eat Drink Local Week kicked off last night at Top of the Park in Hillcrest! Patrons sipped, danced, and nibbled the night away ushering in a week chock full of foodie events. Check out Edible San Diego's website for a list of events and participating restaurants. http://www.ediblecommunities.com/sandiego/

Proceeds from the events benefit Olivewood Gardens and Learning Center, Seeds@City Urban Farm, and Wild Willow Farm and Education Center.