Events

Café Virtuoso to Address Fair Trade Coffee Roasting and Water Conservation at the Good Food Community Fair

By Tania Alatorre, SFUSD Board Member and Good Food Community Fair Coordinator

Savannah PicWe're pleased to announce that Café Virtuoso will present at this year's Good Food Community Fair. Café Virtuoso, founded and owned by Laurie Britton, is the only 100% certified organic and fair-trade coffee roaster in San Diego. Her unique café and roasting facility is located in Barrio Logan, a few blocks from Quartyard, making them the perfect community partner.

Laurie has owned the cafe since 2007. Her daughter Savannah works alongside her and trains their talented team of baristas, and leads café coffee classes and “cuppings,” the practice of observing tastes and aromas of brewed coffees. Both have a profound passion for coffee and for supporting organic and fair trade coffees in addition to being long-time supporters of Slow Food. They have a wealth of knowledge of the global coffee industry and sell a unique range of organic beans and teas that they share with their staff. It’s not uncommon that you walk into the Café Virtuoso and learn something new about the coffee you’re about to enjoy. Chat with the baristas, they know their stuff.

restaurant-coffee-cup-cappuccinoSavannah will kick-off the Good Food Community Fair special programming at 11AM with an engaging conversation on how Café Virtuoso selects coffee from farms around the world, roast beans in house, how they have paved the way for women in coffee in San Diego, and what they are doing to conserve water at their café and roasting headquarters. Stay for their latest cold brew paired with Nomad Donuts donut holes!

You can also find Café Virtuoso at the Little Italy farmers market on Saturday’s.

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Master Gardeners Educate and Service San Diego Communities

by Nathan Yick, Slow Food SDSU Chapter Leader

master gardener community gardenSan Diego has over 300* Master Gardeners, passionate gardeners who serve and educate San Diegans on pest control and horticulture for free. Part of a rigorous training program founded in 1980, by the University of California Cooperative Extension, they work alongside teachers and parents helping children with their garden projects. They help community gardens overcome challenges with their plots, and with the drought plaguing California, their services and knowledge are much needed in the gardens.

To help San Diego communities combat the drought, the Master Gardeners have developed their Earth Friendly Gardening program. This program trains gardeners in sustainable gardening addressing things like how to adapt to the drought by providing information on creating an earth friendly garden--information on how to conserve water, maintain soil quality, and reduce waste. Thanks to the Master Gardeners, Community Gardens all over San Diego, like the Agape House by San Diego State University, have thrived and continue to provide fresh and local produce for the community.

"One of my favorite things about being a Master Gardener is helping people with their gardening challenges," says Dominick Fiume who became a Master Gardener through working at the Ark of Taste Heritage Garden in Old Town State Park.

As fulfilling and rewarding experience it is being a Master Gardener, becoming one takes a lot of work. To become certified, students go through a training program consisting of 16 weekly classes taught by agricultural experts which educate aspiring volunteers on pest management and horticulture. They must pass an exam and then volunteer regularly as well as continue their education to keep their certification.

Through their commitment, knowledge and passion for public service in gardening and pest control, the Master Gardeners have helped San Diego communities preserve and create more sustainable gardens.

SFUSD is excited that this passionate and knowledgeable San Diego resource is participating in our 2015 Good Food Community Fair. Look for their booth on wise water use.

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*the original story in the Sept newsletter reported there were over 60 Master Gardeners in San Diego. San Diego has over 300.

 

 

More than Honey and Sweet Sips Networking

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Honey tasting.

Big thanks to everyone who came out for our Sweet Sips networking event in July at Local Habit. Mead tastings by Golden Coast Mead, honey tastings offered by Wild Willow Farms and local beekeepers from the San Diego Beekeepers Society and special honey-based dishes by Chef Jimmy. A sweet time, indeed.

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And thanks to all who joined us for the re-screening of the More than Honey documentary. This is an amazing, intriguing, beautiful and quirky film. Please see it if you haven't already.

For those of you interested in learning more about bees and what you can do locally, here are a few great local resources:

San Diego Beekeeping Society holds classes and meetups to encourage responsible beekeeping. Lots of expert members there. You can find a list of beekeepers on their website who perform live bee removals and other bee resources in the county.

Wild Willow Farm is a non-profit organization offering beekeeping classes (also farming classes). The instructor is very knowledgeable about bee issues locally and globally and can tell you about hosting a hive on your property.

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Girl Next Door Honey offers beekeeping classes and workshops, one-on-one consulting, a host-a-hive program and performs live bee removals.

If you need to remove bees from your property, please consider live removal by one of these folks or those listed on the Beekeeping Society website. Bees are important to our food supply and need a helping hand. Stay tuned for future bee-related events.

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2015 Good Food Community Fair

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SLOW FOOD URBAN SAN DIEGO'S THIRD ANNUAL

GOOD FOOD COMMUNITY FAIR

WATER WISE SAN DIEGO

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2015

11AM - 3PM

@ QUARTYARD IN DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO.

Go to GoodFoodFair.com for more information!

A celebration of artisanal food and craft drinks, cooking demos, art and music, discussion panels with local farmers, chefs, food producers and breweries, and more!

Join us downtown at the Quartyard to mix and mingle with San Diegans working towards a sustainable & delicious San Diego. Special programming and events will cover good, clean and fair food in a time of drought. Entrance is free.

It'll be a delicious time! Go to GoodFoodFair.com for more information!

Interested in Participating?  Would your organization like to host a complimentary booth at the fair? Please fill out this form by September 4th.

Questions? Please contact us at membership@slowfoodurbansandiego.org.

Local Delegates Explore the Ethics of Eating Meat at Slow Meat 2015

slowmeat How are livestock animals raised? What are they fed? How are they processed? What is the impact on the environment and surrounding communities? What are the ethics of eating meat?

The Annual Slow Meat conference, held this year in Denver, Colorado on June 4-6, brought together producers, butchers, thought leaders and eaters of every ethos to address the conundrum of industrial animal husbandry and to celebrate the alternatives. Each year, the diverse attendees join together to take a hard look at the current state of meat and seek solutions to the problems of the industrial system. It's part conversation, part celebration.

Joining this year’s conversation were Slow Food San Diego delegates Jaime Fritsch and Drew Deckman.

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Fritsch came to San Diego from Portland, Oregon in 2014 after spending his time in the Pacific Northwest living in an old homestead farmhouse, traveling to shoot commercial photos and contemplating the state of food issues surrounding his locale. Inspired by the local food movement and drawn to tough questions about what it means to be a conscious omnivore, Fritsch formed alliances with meat producers and storytellers up and down the west coast – Sean Kelley of the San-Diego based art curation group Set & Drift; Camas Davis of the Portland Meat Collective; Michael McGuan of the former Linkery; food writer and TV personality, Troy Johnson; and chef Javier Plascencia of Finca Altozano in Valle de Guadalupe, Ensenada. Together they created Death for Food, an experiential exhibition that examines questions about the process of humanely bringing meat to the table.

Death for Food raises tough questions about the “right” way to harvest animals for consumption. One answer to these questions is Fritsch’s new collaborative project, MEAT San Diego. This meat collective is a group of people that organize themselves to learn about and take ownership of their roles in procuring, raising, butchering, preserving and preparing meat. By coming together as a community that supports good food values, collective members can take classes to learn about animal husbandry, humane slaughter, whole animal butchery, charcuterie, cooking, and more. Members can access local, humanely raised meat animals at a fair price that supports both them and the farmer. MEAT San Diego poses an answer to a regional logistical problem in San Diego (a three-million person metro area with no USDA slaughterhouse within hundreds of miles): how do San Diegans get the best local meat on their dinner tables? Stay tuned as the collective grows in the coming months and years ahead.

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After growing up in Peachtree City, GA and earning a degree at Rhodes College, Drew Deckman followed his passion with a ten-year culinary journey to France, Switzerland and Germany. Drew cooked with “gastro masters” such as Paul Bocuse, Jacques Maximin, Gilles DuPont and Tommy Byrne, and was awarded a coveted Michelin Star for his work in Restaurant Vitus in Germany as well as Rising-Star Chef of the Year in Berlin in 2003 during his tenure as Executive Chef at the Four Seasons Berlin (17pts Gault Millau). Back in the states, after mentoring under star-teacher and cookbook author Madeleine Kamman, Drew became a part of the final class of the School for American Chefs at Beringer Vineyards in Napa Valley, California. He has since then worked in Kona, Hawaii, Cancun, Rome, Shanghai, and in Los Angeles, where he was an entertainer’s private chef.

These rich experiences and Drew’s desire to create and serve Mexican-influenced haute cuisine “drew” him to the rich shores of San Jose del Cabo as the owner and chef of Deckman’s in San Jose, and now to the Guadalupe Valley where in 2012 Deckman’s en El Mogor was born. This al fresco organic restaurant is nestled amid the Mogor Badan Winery in the Guadalupe Valley in Northern Baja California. Drew remains dedicated to the local, sustainable ingredients in the food he sources and prepares at his restaurant, sourcing much of it from the Mogor Badan farm. He is Regional Governor for Slow Food International in Baja California and Brand Ambassador for SmartFishAC a sustainable fisheries NGO.

We are excited to hear what our delegates bring back from Slow Meat 2015! Be sure to join us at Slow Sips on June 17 from 6-8 at Carnitas Snack Shack, featuring Jaime Fritsch as our special guest and a future seafood event with Chef Drew. 

Roosevelt Middle School Garden Volunteers Build Big!

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DSC_0313 From constructing raised beds for planting sweet potatoes to weeding garden boxes in preparation for the summer harvest, it was a productive day in the garden for the more than 50 volunteers who joined Slow Food Urban San Diego at Roosevelt Middle School on April 18.  Volunteers, including children, families, community leaders and a team from Navy Logistics, came together to help prepare the community and school gardens for planting.

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The Roosevelt school gardens are home to educational classes and community activities that allow students and local residents to development a deeper sense of self, their relationship with nature, our community, and our world.

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After a fun day in the sun (sunscreen provided!), volunteers shared stories and relaxed while munching on burritos donated by Chipotle and snacks provided by Specialty Produce.

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-contributed by Kathryn Rogers

UrbanLife Farms Volunteer Day - A great success!

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A huge thank you to Slow Food Urban San Diego volunteers who came out in March to help UrbanLife students garden at their farm. Volunteers planted 12 fruit trees and put in 2,500 linear feet of beds for veggies! Do you want to help bring Good, Clean & Fair food to San Diego youth and schools? Contact volunteer@slowfoodurbansandiego.org.

Slow Food Urban San Diego is partnering with UrbanLife and we need volunteers to help with gardening. UrbanLife transforms vacant plots of land into self-sustaining urban farms, providing jobs and job skills training to urban youth, cultivating health and wellness education, and growing fresh healthy produce for our youth and local communities.

UrbanLife just broke ground on their second location in southeast San Diego. This one-acre farm will employ youth in the area, teach them job skills, and bring healthy produce back into the neighborhood. The students grow all the food themselves, maintain the land and put together CSA boxes. Their wages come out of CSA boxes sold.

Slow Food Urban San Diego volunteers worked alongside the students on Saturday, March 14th.

Terroir and Terra Madre

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by Sarah Shoffler, SFUSD Board Member

In October 2014, slow foodies from the world over gathered at Slow Food International's biennial events in Turin, Italy, Salone del Gusto, the world’s largest food and wine exposition, and Terra Madre, a world meeting of food communities. Attendees affectionately call them the Olympics of Food. The concurrent events are dedicated to the celebration and sharing of artisanal, sustainable food and the small-scale producers that safeguard local traditions and high quality products. Good, Clean and Fair food from around the world.

Several San Diegan slow foodies attended as U.S. delegates. Aundrea Dominguez, a San Diego farmer and Slow Food Urban San Diego Ark of Taste Chair, attended in 2014 for the first time and shared her thoughts on the experience with us.

Why did you want to go?

Prior to this last year when I became more actively involved in Slow Food, I had not heard of Terra Madre, though once I knew about it, I had no doubt I would go. Besides the obvious reasons (great food and sights) my main reason for going this year was the theme, Ark of Taste. As a culinary gardener/farmer, preserving biodiversity is a hugely important part of what I do, which is also why I was drawn to that particular seat on the SFUSD board. I also wanted to use the opportunity to save and swap seeds, which I did.

Did you focus on any particular aspect of TM? If so, what?

Ark of Taste. Between the three days, I spent probably about 6-8 hours throughout the display, reading about the foods and where they were from, and speaking with the folks who farm/prepare, and eat them. It was so eye opening for me. It's one thing to read a list of food and an entirely different experience to walk through the physical catalog and have a tactile and sensory relationship with it.

What is one thing you learned?

I learned many small and specific things about terroir. Language was less of a barrier than you would expect when food is the topic at hand. Several farmers and I spoke about soil and why their tomatoes have such specific flavors that cannot be duplicated. One farmer, whose family has owned their land for eight generations, farms on soil with volcanic rock that has been breaking down slowly over about the last 100 years. Minerality like that cannot be replicated by amending soil, the flavors it imparts are inherent. I find that incredible. Having eaten mostly American-grown produce, or that which has been imported from South America, it was such a jolt to eat something I was familiar with but from a place on the other side of the world. It's so different that there is almost no comparing the two.

What was your most memorable experience?

I was fortunate to have snagged a front row seat at the panel with Carlo Petrini, Alice Waters and Jamie Oliver and it was a really encouraging experience to share space in a room of like-minded folks who respect good, clean, and fair food. It was a major highlight. But I also had an unbelievable time at this New Orleans pop-up dinner. I helped cook red beans and rice, and gumbo z'herbes, neither of which I'd ever made before. I was cooking with people from New Orleans, Baja, Chicago, etc. A week before, I hadn't known any of these folks but, we were all there cooking, learning, and embodying the values we were there to support.

Would you go back? Why?

In a heartbeat, and I plan to continue attending. It was the highlight of my year, and it was so reassuring. Farming is notoriously difficult and often thankless, but Terra Madre plugged me into a community that reveres artisans and farmers for answering their calling. Most of the farmers I spoke with got into it because it was a family business but, they also love it because they are productive and intimately connected to something exceptional, and I want to be part of that.

What would you recommend to anyone that goes in 2016?

I'll be very practical about this answer...I would recommend that they do their research on vendors and do the Salone del Gusto on the very first day, and the very last day. Also, wear good walking shoes, and have a backpack for goodies, not a shoulder bag. A first-timer should be prepared to spend the entire first day just visiting vendors, tasting, making notes, deciding what they want to buy and buying only the things they cannot live without first. Backpacks get heavy fast. The last day is great because you can score major deals on yummy goods.

I would also suggest having business cards with your basic contact info, because you'll be making lots of friends.

Get an AirBnb close by, and portable Wifi if you can.

Bring your A-game and sleep on the flight home.

Above all else, I would recommend being open to whatever presents itself at Salone and Terra Madre. There were many unexpected surprises for me, and not a single time was I disappointed.

Slow Food Helps Downtown Seniors Eat Good, Clean, Fair Food

This November Slow Food Urban San Diego's Market Bucks program provided 30 local seniors with a farmer's market tour, $10 worth of free produce and a cooking demonstration featuring a fall salad trio. Thirty members of Serving Seniors' Feeling Fit Club joined Slow Food for a tour of the Little Italy Mercato and a bag of fresh produce from Suzie's Farm, courtesy of our generous Market Bucks donors.

Following the tour, one of Slow Food's resident chefs provided a cooking demonstration of nourishing and nutritious salads featuring the fresh produce each senior took home.

The participating seniors loved exploring the Mercato, and learning about the fresh, local food available in their neighborhood and how to easily prepare it at home. Thank you to everyone who purchased market bucks to help us provide fresh produce for this program and to our partners at the Little Italy Mercato, Serving Seniors and Suzie's Farm. We look forward to hosting this event again in the future!

Community Nights at Napizza!

We are so very honored to have been selected to be a beneficiary of Little Italy's Napizza Community nights! Every Tuesday in November from 3pm-9pm 10% of each check will be donated to support Slow Food Urban San Diego. Sourcing ingredients from local and organic farms to make their handcraft pizzas and salads Napizza uses Slow Food principals when crafting their delicious dishes. Procedes from Community Nights at Napizza will go right back to support school garden programs, educational efforts and other good food work in the San Diego Urban community! We hope to see you there for this delicious fundraiser!

3rd Annual Loving Local Music & Local Food Event

Slow Food Urban San Diego is thrilled to be one of the beneficiaries of this year's Loving Local Music & Local Food event alongside Blues Lovers United on Sunday August 10th.

Enjoy a beautiful waterfront view while enjoying Snake Oil Cocktails and appetizers. Later on dinner guests will later enjoy a four course sit down dinner while listening to the swinging music of the Whitney Shay Quartet, and the blues and Cajun sounds of the Bayou Brothers with Michele Lundeen and Dane Terry.

Guests will have the opportunity to connect with a caring community while enjoying simple, sustainable and elegant food, music and drinks graciously donated and prepared by some of the most sustainable people in our community. Every ticket holder, sponsor, and supporter is an in-tune partner for the success of Loving Local Music & Local Food. Last years event was a sell out, so don't delay getting your tickets.

Loving Local Music & Local Food have graciously offered our Slow Food Urban SD members a discounted ticket price on both the general admission and VIP tickets. Be sure to get your tickets early as this event is sure to fill up fast!

 

$40 Cocktail Party Tickets: 21 tickets left!

  • Welcome cocktail
  • Enjoy appetizers and two drink tickets during the cocktail portion of the benefit
  • Mix, mingle and take the opportunity bid on fabulous silent auction items
  • Listen to the sounds of the Bayou Brothers

 

$100 General Admission Tickets: 37 tickets left!

  • Welcome cocktail
  • Enjoy appetizers and two drink tickets during the cocktail portion of the benefit
  • Mix, mingle and take the opportunity bid on fabulous silent auction items
  • Listen to the sounds of the Bayou Brothers
  • Four course sit down dinner paired with local wines and finished with organic coffee
  • Enjoy the Whitney Shay Quartet
  • You'll leave with a treat!

 

$165 VIP Tickets: only 16 seats left!

Please make sure to email: yourneighboroncall@gmail.com immediately after purchase to confirm your VIP Table Seats.

  • Valet Parking & Premiere Seating
  • Early check-in (3:00 PM)
  • Welcome cocktail
  • Enjoy appetizers and unlimited drinks during the cocktail portion of the benefit
  • Special cheese table during the cocktail reception from Venissimo Cheese
  • Mix, mingle and take the opportunity bid on fabulous silent auction items
  • Listen to the sounds of the Bayou Brothers
  • You will be dining with one of our VIP Table Hosts
  • Four course sit down dinner paired with local wines and finished with organic coffee
  • Enjoy the Whitney Shay Quartet
  • You'll leave with a treat

Here is a list of our VIP table hosts with seats still available:

Dwane Brown - KPBS News Anchor (3 seats left!)

Randy & Marie Jones - Restaurateur and 2 time All Star, Cy Young winning former Padres Pitcher (3 seats left!)

Cathryn Beeks - ListenLocalsd.com and The Homegrown Hour on KPRi & Troy Johnson - San Diego Magazine Food Critic and Food Network guest judge (8 seats left!)

Dave Good - Writer and San Diego Reader music critic & Lafayette - Legendary Blues Guitarist (2 seats left!)

Looking forward to seeing you there!!

March Slow Sips!

Join us for Slow Sips on March 19th, 6-8pm, at Fish Public! This month we have a extra special treat for you! We'll be celebrating Sustainable Seafood Month as part of our monthly Slow Sips event!

As always, you'll be able to learn more about getting involved in our grass-roots organization, sign up to be a volunteer, and meet and mingle with like-minded friends. There will be a cash bar and full menu available for ordering. In addition, thanks to a Collaborative Fisheries Research West grant awarded to researchers at California Sea Grant based at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and at University of San Diego we are also able to feature  complimentary samples of local seafood prepared by the Fish Public kitchen!

This is a Slow Sips event you won't want to miss!

Please let us know that you're coming: RSVP here!

 

About Fish Public: Restaurant visionary Tracy Borkum manifests a quaint 3,500-square-foot seafood eatery in San Diego’s charming Kensington neighborhood with Fish Public, which opened doors in June 2013. Fish offers quality sea fare at accessible price points and draws culinary inspiration from the Atlantic’s Gulf Coast, New England and English Coast as well as West Coast of America, Baja and Pacific Rim regions. Unique offerings include an artisan retail area and a custom chef’s oyster counter with peek-a-boo views into the kitchen. The interior design, spearheaded by Borkum herself, is reminiscent of a Nantucket-inspired beach cottage with a light and airy appeal.

Focal details include whitewashed wood accents and unexpected lighting fixtures fashioned from old fishing nets. Fish Public’s beverage program is comprised of draft craft beers, an international wine selection and an eclectic cocktail menu with all mixers, syrups and infusions made in-house.

Fish Public is located at 4055 Adams Avenue and is open Sunday from 5-9pm, Tuesday through Thursday from 5-9pm, and Friday through Saturday from 5-10pm. Happy Hour is Tuesday-Sunday from 5-6:30pm. For more information please visit www.fishpublic.com or check or call 619.281.4014. For updates visit Fish Public on Facebook at www.facebook.comm/fish.public or Twitter at @fishpublic.

Craft Your Own Wood-Fired Pizza at Suzie's Farm

Chef Jenn, local cooking school teacher (and Slow Food Urban San Diego board member) is joining forces with yet another local farm for a series of cooking classes.

This summer, Chef Jenn will be teaching wood fired oven pizza cooking at Suzie’s Farm. Suzie’s Farm is a 140-acre USDA-certified organic farm located 13 miles south of downtown San Diego. It grows more than 100 varieties of seasonal vegetables, herbs, flowers, and fruits year-round. Classes take place in the farm’s beautiful outdoor event space.

These totally hands-on culinary adventures with Chef Jenn are a blast. You’ll get a tour of the farm, one-on-one instruction from a professional culinary instructor, and the opportunity to sit with new friends and enjoy the meal you created together. In this particularly class, you’ll handcraft your own whole wheat pizza dough made with local beer and top it with fresh meat and produce straight from Suzie's Farm. By the time you depart, you’ll know a number of new and creative ways to incorporate delicious, wholesome ingredients into pizza recipes!

Space is limited, so sign up now! https://www.sidetour.com/experiences/pizza-making-chef-jenn-felmley-san-ysidro

Join Slow Food Urban San Diego at the first annual Good Food Community Fair!

When: Sunday October 27th, 10am-2pm

Location: San Diego Public Market, 1735 National Avenue, San Diego, California 92113

As a celebration of Food Day, San Diego organizations in the Good, Clean & Fair Food communities are gathering for a day of learning, sharing & fun!

Join us at the San Diego Public Market to meet and mingle with San Diegans working towards a sustainable & delicious San Diego.

This is a free community event open to the public. There will be prizes a schnazzy Slow-photobooth and of course...food!

Participating Good Food Community Fair partners include: The 1:1 Movement,Alchemy, California Rare Fruit Growers, San Diego Chapter, Catalina Offshore Products, Edible San Diego, Feeding America San Diego, Jack Ford, Front Burner FundGolden Coast MeadSan Diego Food BankJeanne's Garden Program for Children, Leah's Pantry & EatFresh.org, Meals4Hunger, Olivewood Gardens and Learning Center, Peace Garden, Project New Village, San Diego Community Garden Network, San Diego County Farm Bureau, San Diego Hunger Coalition, San Diego Public Market, San Diego Unified School District's Farm to School Program, Seeds@City Urban Farm, Slow Money SoCal, Specialty Produce, Starlite, Totes Upcycled, UC San Diego Pediatrics - School Wellness Program, Susie's Farm, Veg-Appeal, Whole Foods Market Hillcrest, Wild Willow Farm & Education Center

Looking forward to seeing you there!!

3rd Annual Slow Food Urban San Diego Food and Seed Swap!

Rejoice! It's Spring! Slow Food Urban San Diego and San Diego Seed Company are teaming up with Wild Willow Farm and Education Center for a Food and Seed Swap! Bring your tightly sealed home made-jams, baked goods, seeds and cookbooks for an afternoon of trading and recipe sharing. Stick around after the trade for a Spring Gardening class, tour of the farm and the Wild Willow Potluck. It's going to be a great day!

Please bring your best batch of jam, your Nonna's sauerkraut recipe, your uncle Willis's blue ribbon barbecue sauce and your surplus of backyard meyer lemons for trade and barter. Don't miss this wonderful day on the farm chalk-full of good food, good vibes and good folk.

Food and Seed Swap Schedule
Saturday April 27th
1pm: Check-in for the Food and Seed Swap
1:30-4pm: Swap goodies with others, learn new recipes, get seeds to plant in your garden, and get inspired to live the Slow Food way of life.
4-5pm: Spring Planting Basics class. Learn how to start your garden. There's nothing better than your own homegrown produce!
5:30pm: Farm tour of Wild Willow Educational Farm

6:15pm: Wild Willow Potluck- bring a dish to share and/or donation for the world famous wood-fired pizza!

 What can I bring to the Food and Seed Swap?
  • Seeds you are saving
  • Tightly sealed food stuffs (pickles, jam, sauces, etc)
  • Baked goods
  • Your surplus produce from your garden and/or fruit trees
  • Old cookbooks
Please be sure to label all ingredients.

Click here to download and complete the Swap Agreement Form.  They will also be available to fill out the day of the event.

 When: Saturday April 27th

Where: Wild Willow Farm and Education Center

2550 Sunset Avenue, San Diego 92154

Cost: Free!

RSVP on our Facebook event page!

Questions? Please contact Jenna Barnes at education@slowfoodurbansandiego.org

Join us for a Wooly Pig Carnitas Cook-out!

Turn in your taxes and Join Slow Food Urban San Diego, The Linkery, Chef Jair Téllez of Laja Restaurant in the Valle de Guadalupe and Rancher Sam Woolley of Valley Center for a carnitas cook-out.  Arrive early for a presentation on this Ark of Taste recognized breed and a meet and greet with the Chef and Rancher.

Tickets are $15 for three tacos and a small draft beer or soda.  Tacos will also be sold á la carte for $4/each the day of the event.

Ark of Taste Presentation begins at 12:30 PM

We'll see you there!

Ready for the Holiday Mixer?

Please join us in celebrating the season at our Holiday Mixer with Saltbox at the Hotel Palomar on Wednesday, December 12th from 5:30 - 7:30.

Chef Simon Dolinky will prepare complimentary bites from the Saltbox kitchen using seasonal and local ingredients. Cocktail specials, local beer and California wine will also be available. This event will be held on the rooftop deck so, bring a jacket!

Please Register by Monday, December 10th.
We hope to see you there!
Happy Holidays from Slow Food Urban San Diego!

Pig Pickin’ in Support of Organics in Local 4H Programming

Here are some photos from today's tasty pig pickin' at Roots Community Kitchen in Santee. Thanks Henry for raising such a delicious pig as well as raising awareness among your fellow 4H members about organic animal husbandry! And a round of applause for all the chefs and local beverage purveyors for cooking up and complementing all those pork dishes!